Nickelodeon to have big presence in CBS Super Bowl coverage

Posted on February 8, 2021Categories znvbmgteTags , , , , , , , , , , ,   Leave a comment on Nickelodeon to have big presence in CBS Super Bowl coverage

first_imgThere might be a kids-focused broadcast of the Super Bowl eventually. It just won’t be this year. Nickelodeon will still have a noticeable presence during Sunday’s coverage on CBS. Following the success of Nickelodeon’s presentation of an NFL playoff contest last month, CBS Sports chairman Sean McManus said there were some discussions about an encore for Sunday’s matchup between the Kansas City Chiefs and Tampa Bay Buccaneers before deciding to keep everything on CBS. McManus said that Nickelodeon will have a real presence at the Super Bowl in some very creative ways.last_img

Alum finds success with classical music group

Posted on January 26, 2021Categories znvbmgteTags , , , , , , , , , , ,   Leave a comment on Alum finds success with classical music group

first_imgWhen Patrick Dupre Quigley came to Notre Dame as a freshman in the fall of 1996, he was unaware that his participation in campus choral ensembles would provide him with a clear career path into music, let alone help his musical group top Lady Gaga on the iTunes charts this past summer. “I helped found The Undertones during my freshman year and served as their music director for four years,” Quigley, a 2000 Notre Dame graduate, said. “Working with that group taught me that there is a market for vocal music out there, and I realized that I wanted to be a conductor.” As a music theory major and member of The Undertones and the Glee Club, Quigley explored his interest in music and had the opportunity to travel the world as a performer during his time at Notre Dame. “My interest in music was twofold: I really loved the music we performed, and at Notre Dame, I was able to perform in three continents and 46 states,” Quigley said.”I couldn’t find a downside to being involved in music.” After following his interests to a master’s degree in conducting from Yale University, Quigley currently serves as the founding artistic director for Seraphic Fire, a Miami-based professional choral ensemble that performs classical, renaissance, baroque and secular music. Their recent collaboration with the Western Michigan University Chorale, Claudio Monteverdi: Vespers of the Blessed Virgin 1610, was released in August, reached the No. 1 spot on the iTunes classical charts and outsold Lady Gaga’s The Fame Monster at one point. The 64 performers who appeared on the album — including 12 members of Seraphic Fire and 40 members of the Western Michigan University Chorale — harnessed the power of the Internet and word of mouth to publicize their new album and garnered outstanding results, Quigley said. “When the disc was released, iTunes featured it on their classical homepage,” Quigley said. “From there, I tagged all the members of the ensemble in a post on Facebook, and they shared the iTunes link to the album on their Facebook pages. It got to the point where people I knew from grade school started publicizing the album, which propelled it to the Top Ten.” Quigley said this “viral moment” caught the attention of the National Public Radio program “All Things Considered,” which did a segment on the group and its grassroots publicity methods. The effects of this national attention for the group were unprecedented. “Within an hour of the program’s airing, the album hit number one on the iTunes classical charts,” Quigley said. “We remained on the best seller list for over a month, and one day we even beat out Lady Gaga.” Seraphic Fire’s commercial success comes eight years after Quigley first became involved with the group, shortly after he completed graduate school and relocated to Miami to work as the music director for a large Catholic parish. “While I was working at the church, I met a number of professional singers who were section leaders in one of the seven church choirs I directed,” Quigley said. Quigley and a group of eight professional vocalists initially performed three concerts as Seraphic Fire, but the group expanded significantly over the next three years to the point where Quigley could no longer direct the group as a mere side project. During its third year of existence, Seraphic Fire was invited to record with Shakira on her album, “Oral Fixation, Vol. 2.” That same year, the group also began performing with the Miami Symphony Orchestra, and Quigley decided to commit to the group as its full-time artistic director. “At that point, only two people worked for the group — myself and the office manager/grant writer,” Quigley said. “Now the organization is much bigger and involves more performers.” A number of the group’s performers were doctoral students at the University of Miami who eventually went on to become music professors or full-time professional musicians who perform with operas and symphonies or in choral ensembles around the country, Quigley said. In fact, the members of Seraphic Fire are all professional musicians or professors, and none perform with the group full-time. Seraphic Fire, now in its ninth season, comprises 40 members from around the country and performs about 65 concerts per season, mostly in Miami and other southern Florida metropolitan areas, Quigley said. The group did perform in Mexico City in May, and it will travel to the Midwest twice this winter, including a concert at Notre Dame on Jan. 19. Additionally, the group often collaborates with other ensembles in its performances and recordings, such as the Firebird Chamber Orchestra and various choral ensembles. Quigley said the group has two more albums due out within the next few months, including a Christmas recording and a disc with the Firebird Orchestra. “Our goal for the future is to expand our recorded legacy because there’s a big shift away from the traditional recording model for classical music to the new digital music economy,” Quigley said. “One of the great things about our album’s success is that the power of large record labels in digital distribution of classical music is diminished, but word of mouth is much more important in promoting our product in the digital world.” Quigley said the demographic of iTunes customer is generally much younger than the traditional classical music consumer, usually assumed to be affluent people over the age of 55. The popularity of Seraphic Fire’s album on iTunes leads Quigley to believe that his group has successfully “cracked the egg that is the digital music economy.” “If younger people are buying classical music on iTunes, that means that classical music is alive and well, and new audiences are being exposed to it,” Quigley said. “It’s incredibly heartening.”last_img read more

College to give Internet security training sessions

Posted on January 26, 2021Categories gkdecinrTags , , , , , , , , , , ,   Leave a comment on College to give Internet security training sessions

first_imgTo boost awareness of computer security threats, Saint Mary’s College Information Technology will offer computer security awareness sessions Monday Oct. 25. Kathy Hausmann, coordinator of student computing, said three sessions will be offered at noon, 4 p.m. and 7 p.m. to educate students, faculty and staff about the dangers of the Internet, as well as other computer security topics. Hausmann said she would talk about malware, which is malicious software for the computer, as well as phishing, which is an attempt to acquire passwords or personal information illegally. She will also talk about using file sharing programs like LimeWire, how to create effective passwords and Facebook privacy. According to Hausmann, each time a computer is logged onto the Internet, it is vulnerable to a variety of threats. “I think it’s important that students, faculty and staff attend the sessions because as long as they are using a computer, they are connected to the Internet, they have e-mail accounts, [then] they are susceptible to the threats that are online,” she said. “We’ll just be going over best practices of what you should be aware of if you are online.” Hausmann said members of the College community have already been affected by such threats. “We have had several instances of faculty, staff and student computers infected with malware,” she said. “Since August, we have had faculty and students be affected by phishing scams and we also have had issues with students having peer-to-peer file sharing applications on their computer.” Similar sessions have been offered in previous years, Hausmann said, but because of the constant changes in technology, this year’s sessions will offer more up-to-date information. “I’ve done these sessions for a couple of years now, but they keep changing,” she said. “Just as the technology changes, the scammers and the spammers and the hackers and the malware writers come up with new ways to trick people and so we always have to try to be one step ahead of them. “These are our tools for defense. Education is what can protect you.”last_img read more

Excise police prepare for game

Posted on January 26, 2021Categories cryfsvynTags , , , , , , , , , , ,   Leave a comment on Excise police prepare for game

first_imgAs campus prepares for a weekend of football, parties and tailgates, the Indiana State Excise Police are doubling their efforts to enforce alcohol, tobacco and public safety laws in the area. Notre Dame has been added to the law enforcement agency’s Intensified College Enforcement (ICE) program, the product of a federal grant funding additional police presence around campuses within Indiana, Excise Police Sergeant Ally Taylor said. “It’s just an increase in our presence in those areas enforcing alcohol and tobacco laws as well as public safety,” he said. “[Notre Dame] was added this year but [the program] has been in place since last year.” The initiative began in February, but originally only targeted Ball State University, DePauw University and Indiana University, an Excise Police press release stated. While the new program will enable more excise officers to patrol the South Bend area, Taylor said it will not impact enforcement by local agencies. “It doesn’t include other police departments, but we’re always working in collaboration with local law enforcement,” Taylor said. “The ICE enforcement itself is an excise program.” Taylor said college campuses naturally draw more law enforcement attention during football season. “Normally during football season there’s a large number of people gathering, tailgating or at house parties, and we end up receiving calls or complaints to investigate,” he said. Many investigations result from these complaints; however, Taylor said excise is frequently patrolling for suspicious or illegal activity. “We’re always looking for underage people looking to procure alcohol. If and when those activities occur, and we’re there, we’ll definitely investigate,” he said. “It’s our job to regulate and enforce these laws for the state of Indiana.” He said the agency is in constant collaboration with the University and student government to encourage a positive working relationship with a common goal of maximizing student safety. “We’ve met with the on-campus student government as well as the off-campus president,” he said. “I was recently at the Student Safety Summit along with all the law enforcement in St. Joseph County as well as NDSP, talking about not just alcohol and related issues but also security and safety issues.” Taylor said the ICE program and all of the agency’s efforts are intended to protect, not target students. “By no means should Notre Dame students feel that officers are after them,” he said. “Their safety and security is of the utmost concern to every law enforcement officer in the area.”,As campus prepares for a weekend of football, parties and tailgates, the Indiana State Excise Police are doubling their efforts to enforce alcohol, tobacco and public safety laws in the area. Notre Dame has been added to the law enforcement agency’s Intensified College Enforcement (ICE) program, the product of a federal grant funding additional police presence around campuses within Indiana, Excise Police Sergeant Ally Taylor said. “It’s just an increase in our presence in those areas enforcing alcohol and tobacco laws as well as public safety,” he said. “[Notre Dame] was added this year but [the program] has been in place since last year.” The initiative began in February, but originally only targeted Ball State University, DePauw University and Indiana University, an Excise Police press release stated. While the new program will enable more excise officers to patrol the South Bend area, Taylor said it will not impact enforcement by local agencies. “It doesn’t include other police departments, but we’re always working in collaboration with local law enforcement,” Taylor said. “The ICE enforcement itself is an excise program.” Taylor said college campuses naturally draw more law enforcement attention during football season. “Normally during football season there’s a large number of people gathering, tailgating or at house parties, and we end up receiving calls or complaints to investigate,” he said. Many investigations result from these complaints; however, Taylor said excise is frequently patrolling for suspicious or illegal activity. “We’re always looking for underage people looking to procure alcohol. If and when those activities occur, and we’re there, we’ll definitely investigate,” he said. “It’s our job to regulate and enforce these laws for the state of Indiana.” He said the agency is in constant collaboration with the University and student government to encourage a positive working relationship with a common goal of maximizing student safety. “We’ve met with the on-campus student government as well as the off-campus president,” he said. “I was recently at the Student Safety Summit along with all the law enforcement in St. Joseph County as well as NDSP, talking about not just alcohol and related issues but also security and safety issues.” Taylor said the ICE program and all of the agency’s efforts are intended to protect, not target students. “By no means should Notre Dame students feel that officers are after them,” he said. “Their safety and security is of the utmost concern to every law enforcement officer in the area.”last_img read more

Wuthering Heights

Posted on January 26, 2021Categories lodfkjsaTags , , , , , , , , , , ,   Leave a comment on Wuthering Heights

first_imgSaint Mary’s Aquila Theatre will host a live production of the novel “Wuthering Heights” on Oct. 13, at 7:30 p.m. in the O’Laughlin Auditorium.This performance is part of the Shaheen/Duggan Performing Arts Series, which also includes the production of “Raisin’ Cane: A Harlem Renaissance Odyssey” which will be performed Sept. 18.Richard Baxter, Director of Special Events at Saint Mary’s College, said both performances are a good opportunity for students to get involved with the arts on campus.“You have the Harlem Renaissance [Odyssey] this month and the classic English novel the next month,” he said. “Who wouldn’t want to experience that?”Baxter said the goal of the Performing Arts Series is to provide the students with a well-rounded experience during their four years in school.“So they should, within this four year period, experience theatre, dance, comedy,” Baxter said. “They should be provided with a healthy mix of what performing arts would be so that when they leave here, if they have attended, they can say ‘wow, I’ve experienced this, this, and this,’ rather than only one nutrient. It’s a healthy diet.”Since many are familiar with Emily Bronte’s classic novel, Baxter said he hopes the students can experience this novel in a whole new way.“Often times when you read a great novel, you enjoy it on a very personal level,” he said. “If you were to go see a theatrical version of that novel you get to experience it as a group, and I am hoping that is what they are going to get.“I want them to experience some excitement and experience a different facet of the story because they’ll see the characters, they’ll experience the action and it’s a great theatre company.”Baxter said he wants to open up students’ minds to a new way of thinking about the novel.“Students will have a chance to see things in the story that they never anticipated, or they will be reaffirmed of what they read,” he said. “It’s just a different way to experience a great story.”Tickets for Saint Mary’s, Notre Dame and Holy Cross students are $13.“This is an opportunity that doesn’t come along very often,” he said. “Prices are relatively low and the experience is rich, and it’s here.“You can roll out of your room and come see an exciting performance, and you don’t have to deal with parking or any of those things that you would associate with good theatre. You don’t even need to check your coat. You can just come in and enjoy the performance and write about it or think about it or plan your next attendance.”Tags: Bronte, Harlem Renaissance Odyssey, Performing Arts Series, Richard Baxter, Shaheen/Duggan, Wuthering Heightslast_img read more

Student Players to debut song cycle, ‘Edges’

Posted on January 26, 2021Categories sqfxhpcjTags , , , , , , , , , , ,   Leave a comment on Student Players to debut song cycle, ‘Edges’

first_imgPhoto Courtesy of Kelly Burke From Thursday to Sunday, Student Players will perform “Edges,” a song cycle written by two University of Michigan sophomores in 2005 that explores the edges and turning points that seem to define our lives.“It’s a song cycle, so it’s not a traditional musical,” sophomore Kelly Burke, one of the show’s directors, said. “Basically, it doesn’t have any dialogue, it doesn’t have a traditional plot, but it’s a series of songs that are all centered on the theme of being on the edge of something in life.”The song cycle was originally written for males and two females to play all 12 roles. Burke and fellow director, sophomore Roisin Goebelbecker, however, have taken the show’s flexibility and run with it — expanding the cast to seven females and five males and arranging the songs in a specific order.“We’ve given it more of an arc than it was written with — all of the actors are the same character all the way through, and they start kind of unsure of themselves and unsure of what they want, and by the end of the show they’ve all become more confident and self-assured,” Burke said.Burke and Goebelbecker applied for Student Players to produce the musical after seeing the number of students who wanted to do musical theatre but were turned away from PEMCo’s Grease.“We thought, ‘it’s kind of sad that’s the only opportunity that students have to do musical theatre because that’s the only group that does productions — maybe we could do our own production with a different group … we just kind of made the opportunity,” Burke said.While PEMCo specializes in musicals and Not So Royal Shakespeare Company specializes in Shakespeare, Student Players falls somewhere in the middle.“We’re kind of moving in the direction of dubbing Student Players as a place for people to do their passion projects,”Goebelbecker said.“So if you really want to do a show about social justice issues, you can apply to do a show about social justice issues and if it seems like you’re ready and prepared to do it, then student players will help make it happen.” Balancing the roles of director and actor has been a new experience for Goebelbecker and Burke, both of whom are hesitant to call themselves “directors” in the traditional sense. Creating the show, they said, has been a democratic, respectful and, though stressful, mostly pain-free process.“We wanted to make it a collaborative experience,” Goebelbecker said. “Because we are leading the project and we’re also in it, that means there’s limitations on how much we can do in both roles, and those limitations are less of an issue if people step in and offer their perspectives and their ideas.”Part of that process was creating the characters themselves. Most of the show’s roles are unnamed and there is not much characterization within the lyrics themselves, necessitating the creation of unique characters for every production.“It took a lot of imagination and creativity,” Goebelbecker said. “We sat down and decided where their character was from, what college they went to, what they majored in, if they went to college, what their family looks like, what their biggest fears and loves are … people had to draw on their own experiences to answer those questions, but then that became a character separate from themself.”Directing “Edges” has reinforced in both Goebelbecker and Burke the importance of taking initiative and working collaboratively. They hope the audience members will also gain something from watching the small narratives unfold before them — an understanding of their own edges and how they can, in Burke’s words, “take the leap.”“Looking back, I wouldn’t have done anything differently,” Burke said.Tags: Edges, Song cycles, Student Playerslast_img read more

NDVotes prepares for National Voter Registration Day with event

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first_imgNDVotes hosted “Popcorn, Pie and Politics” on Monday to kick off a 24-hour campaign registering students to vote on National Voter Registration Day on Wednesday. The event, held in Geddes Hall Coffee House, featured remarks by professors Geoffrey Layman and David Campbell.“We started NDVotes in the three semesters ahead of the 2016 election, focusing on registration, education and mobilization,” Rosie McDowell, director of justice education at the Center for Social Concerns, said. Zachary Yim | The Observer NDVotes representatives help students sign up for TurboVote, an online platform that facilitates the voterregistration and absentee voting processes. NDVotes, a non-partisan group, seeks to foster educated voting.“There was such enthusiasm that we decided to continue the education aspect. We continued our ‘Pizza, Pop, and Politics’ series,” McDowell said, referencing the periodic events where professors speak about politics.McDowell explained that NDVotes’ campaign for National Voter Registration Day is a competition to see which dorm can sign up the most residents for TurboVote, a program the helps people register to vote and keep them apprised of elections in their home region. The dorm that wins will receive a cash prize to spend on an event. NDVotes is a non-partisan organization.The first hour of the event offered attendees the chance to check their voter registration and sign up for TurboVote. The second hour of the event featured speeches from Layman and Campbell about the importance of voting.In his brief remarks, Layman described an experience from his life that underscored the point of casting a ballot.“When politicians and parties are telling you to vote, they say, ‘one vote can decide an election,’” Layman said. “We always say, ‘no.’”Layman talked about an incident in his hometown of Pulaski, Virginia that proved that one vote could swing the outcome of an election. When he was in graduate school, the courthouse in the town burned down.“They had a ballot referendum on raising property taxes to rebuild,” Layman said. “I didn’t get an absentee ballot, and it lost by one vote. Elections can be decided by one vote.”Layman jokingly said that his failure to get an absentee ballot deeply affected his father, who was inconvenienced by the fire at the courthouse because his law office was located directly across the street.Campbell discussed the importance of voting in the context of the 2000 presidential election between George W. Bush and Al Gore, using an actual polling booth from that election as an example of his point.“On election night 2000, I went to a viewing party to watch the results come in. When I left at 2 a.m., we didn’t know who won. We didn’t know for a month because of chaos in Florida,” Campbell said.Campbell said the causes for chaos, particularly in Palm Beach County, where the election ended up being decided. He cited the county’s use of a butterfly ballot, the layout of which made it easy for Gore voters to accidentally vote for Reform Party candidate Pat Buchanan. He also listed the number of electoral races present on the ballot and pointed out a sign on the polling booth indicating that there was a legal limit of five minutes for voting. Making this process all the more complicated was the nature by which ballots were cast: voters had to punch a hole in a piece of paper. Many holes, called “hanging chads,” were not punched fully, calling into question what counted as a vote and what didn’t. Campbell said the hanging chad problem was likely exacerbated by voters who were in a hurry or who realized they had made a mistake.“It matters not only who votes, but how you vote,” Campbell said.Campbell said that the aftermath of the 2000 election demonstrates the importance of recognizing the differences between potential leaders.“Prior to election day in 2000, one of the dominant themes was that there was little difference between Bush and Gore,” Campbell said. “The morning after and for the next month, they didn’t look so different after all. It matters who’s in charge. In 2000, the nation had a wake up call.”Tags: elections, ND Votes, votinglast_img read more

Best Buddies club to host Flame concert for Disability Awareness Month

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first_imgAs part of its series of Disability Awareness Month events, the Best Buddies Club at Notre Dame is hosting a free concert featuring the band Flame.“[Best Buddies] is a club where we pair up with people in the community who have intellectual and developmental disabilities,” junior and disability awareness coordinator Maggie O’Connell said. “We meet a couple times a month and we are all assigned a buddy, and we basically hang out, dance and have parties. It’s all about gathering together the community and being inclusive — no matter your disability or ability, you come together and have a good time.”Senior and Best Buddies club president Gregory Corning said although the club is simple, it has an important purpose.“The real goal of the club is just to be their friend,” Corning said. “It is a really simple goal, but it is a goal that is often overlooked by people in society.”The Best Buddies club hosted numerous events for Disability Awareness Month, including hanging Spread the Word to End the Word banners in both North and South Dining Halls. However, their biggest event for the month is bringing Flame to Notre Dame. “Flame is a group of 10 individuals who play amazing music and also happen to have disabilities,” Corning said. “ … Their whole tagline is that they don’t let anything stop them from making the music that they want to make.”Flame performed at Notre Dame before, about 10 years ago, and O’Connell said Best Buddies wanted to bring them back to campus. “We thought they were good because, one, they have great music, but also because they showcase that disabilities mean a lot of things for a lot of people,” O’Connell said. “It was inclusive — they all came together despite the wide range of disabilities to go for the same goal.”When asked what she wanted attendees to get out of their concert experience, O’Connell expressed a desire to expand others’ views about people with disabilities. “I hope that they see that being inclusive through Best Buddies and Flame can be inspiring for a lot of people,” she said. “I know for the buddies to see people with disabilities up on stage being superstars gives them something to look up to. I also hope we can show the Notre Dame community that they have disabilities, sure, but that’s not what you need to focus on. They are much more than their disability.”Corning expressed a similar sentiment when adressing what misconceptions about people with disabilities he would want to dispel. “I think people think disabilities mean ‘disabled,’ but I think people with disabilities are a lot more able than people give them credit for,” Corning said. “This is sad, but I think this entire month is moving towards more of a realization that people with disabilities are really able. They might have something that slows them down, they might have something that impedes their success, but it doesn’t impede them from being a capable human being.”Essentially, Flame and Best Buddies are working to show that people with disabilities can still live happy, meaningful lives with purpose and responsibility, O’Connell said. “We want to break any stereotypes people may have about disabilities,” she said. “We want to focus on the fact that anyone can reach their full potential as a person and having a disability does not mean that you can’t do that.” Flame will perform in the Dahnke Ballroom in the Duncan Student Center at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday. Admission is free. Tags: best buddies, disabilities, disability awareness month, flame, notre dame best buddieslast_img read more

Black Hair Expo increases cultural awareness

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first_imgOn Sunday, a “Black Hair Expo,” co-sponsored by the Multicultural Student Programs and Services, the Gender Relations Center, the Office of Student Enrichment and the Department of Africana Studies, helped raise cultural awareness and address lack of hair resources for African American students at Notre Dame in the LaFortune Student Center Ballroom.Paige Jackson, Black Hair Expo event organizer and assistant director of diversity education, outreach and assessment, said when she first began working at Notre Dame, one of her first questions was inquiring about where she could get her hair done.“We have to be able to recognize that this particular group of students, they continue to be marginalized because they have to go off campus to receive the same services that the majority of the students can receive at the LaFortune hair salon and barber,” Jackson said.Looking to address those needs, local barbers and beauticians came to the Black Hair Expo to show their work and give their vendor information to students. The event also featured a panel which discussed the cultural importance of African American hair, as well as hair products, raffle prizes and a performance.One of the greatest burdens for African American students at Notre Dame seeking hair care is the added cost of transportation director of multicultural student programs and services Iris Outlaw said.“We have heard often from students where they had pay for an Uber to get to a barbershop, pay for their haircuts and then pay for the ride back,” Outlaw said. “A cut that could normally be $15 could end up being $25 or $30 when you factor in that their white peers can just go downstairs in LaFortune.”Senior Melody Wilson said she has faced these issues and said that she noticed attempts to increase accessibility to her necessary hair products.“The Huddle has made efforts to get products that are better for my demographic, but also the products are in smaller sizes because the regular sizes are not available to them at a reasonable price,” Wilson said.The Black Hair Expo addressed these resource gaps and as well as the social stigma surrounding black hair. The event catered to the needs of black students but was open to all students of all backgrounds in order to raise awareness of African American hair, Outlaw said.“We’ve had students talk to us about people coming up and just touching their hair which is culturally inappropriate for anyone,” Outlaw said. “I think this event will help them understand that for African American men and women, hair is kind of our crown. You wouldn’t go and touch someone’s crown without permission.”Tags: Black Hair Expo, Black History Month, Gender Relations Centerlast_img read more

Saint Mary’s lecture series focuses on prayer in the face of violence

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first_imgIn a world full of genocide, hunger, pain and suffering, it is sometimes hard for Christians to turn to prayer. However, Boston College assistant professor of theology Dr. Andrew Prevot spoke about the usefulness of prayer in the face of violence in his lecture, “Christian Prayer in a Violent World,” on Thursday.Prevot used examples such as the story of Job, Christian compliance with the Holocaust and congressmen’s responses to the Parkland shootings as failures of prayer — and the prayers of refugees, slaves and leaders of righteous movements as successes. Testimony, music and poetry demonstrate the usefulness of prayer in the face of great violence and tragedy, he said.The lecture mainly focused on one simple question.“What good might Christian prayer do in such a contest in such a world?” Prevot asked.Prevot started by advocating the counterpoint to his argument — listing ways that Christian prayer seems to fail in a violent world.“Given the violence of the world, it might seem to us that Christian prayer is not a very promising way to respond,” he said.One of the ways Prevot described prayer’s futility against violence was the feeling of rejection from God that comes from unanswered prayers.“Praying to response to violence only adds insult to injury,” Prevot said.The second way that he described prayer as escalating violence was through the belief that God is on the side of the perpetrators.“There may be a way of looking at prayer as a way to comfort those doing the violence,” Prevot said.The third way that prayer can be compliant in violence was, according to Prevot, as an excuse for inaction. He highlighted this through the trend of responding to national episodes of gun violence with the phrase “thoughts and prayers.”“This appeal to thoughts and prayers is only helping people to create a more violent world, and doing nothing to prevent it,” Prevot said.Prevot described the ways that prayer can be utilized incorrectly, and in extension, can become a contribution to violence, rather than a solution. The main incorrect usage he described was idol worship, or worshiping a false God. He used former President George W. Bush’s statements on his decisions on the Iraq War happening through prayer as an example.“Is [the Iraq war] the result of [President George W. Bush’s] prayer life?” Prevot challenged. “What kind of God is he worshipping? It is really difficult for us to be sure that we are praying to the true and living God and not just some figment of our imagination. That is just serving our own agenda or selfish needs.”Prevot also discussed how prayer positively affects the world through comfort and inspiration.“Prayer has played a crucial role in the formation of some heroically nonviolent people,” he said. “ … Prayer can prepare one to be a powerful witness to Christ and active servant to his kingdom. Without it, would we have the Catholic Worker’s movement? Would we have the Civil Rights Movement? I’m not really sure.”Prevot believes that prayer is not only a comfort for some, but also a necessity.“The freedom to decide not to pray is really a luxury,” Prevot said. “Many people of this world have nowhere to turn but prayer when they are dealing with the daily tragedies of their lives.”He suggested a raw form of prayer that lacks reservation, especially when someone is praying in response to violence.“In words, silence or screams, with fear, sadness or anger — no decorum is required and no emotion is off limits for prayer to be a place of free expression of whatever feeling you have in this violent world.”Prevot finished by offering a distinct list of ways to pray in order to avoid the mistakes in prayer he mentioned at the beginning of the lecture.“How do we pray in this violent world? … We listen to the cries of the poor and vulnerable … Never use prayer as an excuse not to act. Instead, use it to prepare yourself for action.” Prevot said.Prevot recognized that prayer can seem pointless when faced with the violence of today’s world, but he also added that through the right kind of prayer, violence can be decreased — creating a more peaceful and loving world.“Constancy in this sort of prayer is, I believe, that promises, path toward a less violent world.”Tags: christian prayer in a violent world, Parkland Shooting, prayer, violencelast_img read more