28 09 19

Redshirt sophomore Nathan Tomasello competes in a match against Arizona State on Nov. 13.Credit: Courtesy of OSUDespite two Buckeyes collecting individual titles, the Ohio State wrestling team couldn’t replicate that success across the board this weekend at the Big Ten championships, as it finished third at the two-day event hosted by the University of Iowa. Penn State ran away with the victory, while Iowa squeaked by OSU to grab second place.The Buckeyes earned top-five finishes in five weight classes but could not pick up enough points to catch the Nittany Lions. A win in the heavyweight class pushed OSU close to Iowa, but ultimately the team still came up one point short. Redshirt sophomore Nathan Tomasello continued his dominance in the 125-pound weight class, as the Parma, Ohio, native swept the field on his way to his second straight Big Ten individual title. Tomasello faced a familiar opponent in the finals in Nico Megaludis of Penn State. The two met in a dual-meet earlier this year when the Buckeyes traveled to State College, Pennsylvania. Both times Tomasello was able to walk away with a 3-1 win, but he needed overtime to hold onto his conference title. A strong takedown midway through the extra period gave the redshirt sophomore the win. Redshirt sophomore Bo Jordan failed to decipher his cousin, Isaac Jordan of Wisconsin, for the third time in 12 months in the 165-pound weight class. Much like the two Jordans’ previous matches, there was little action in the first. Bo Jordan scored an escape in the second, but he was on the wrong side of riding time, which made the score technically 1-1. A quick takedown late by Isaac Jordan caught OSU’s wrestler off guard, and Bo Jordan lost 3-1.Even with the loss, which was his second of the season, Bo Jordan will be representing OSU at 165 pounds in the national championships. World champion and sophomore Kyle Snyder ended the tournament with a bang for the Buckeyes against Adam Coon of Michigan. The 7-4 decision for Snyder gave the Woodbine, Maryland, native his first Big Ten title.Snyder had a dominant first two matches, picking up two technical falls. The final match was not as easy for the sophomore, as he had to go through Coon, a runner-up at heavyweight from last year’s national championship.Freshman Myles Martin had a strong showing in his first Big Ten tournament on his way to a third-place finish. After earning a fall in his first bout against Shane Shadaia of Michigan State, Martin earned an 8-2 decision win before running into top-seeded Bo Nickal of Penn State.Nickal pinned Martin, but the freshman recovered to win his next two matches and earn a third-place finish. Redshirt freshman Micah Jordan also finished in third.A No. 1 seed for Micah Jordan did not make things anything easier for the St. Paris Graham High School product. After a 5-3 decision in the first bout, the redshirt freshman dropped an overtime decision to Jimmy Gulibon of Penn State. Micah Jordan would recover in a convincing manner, picking up two major decisions, a technical fall and a fall in his next five matches. The fall came in the third-place match after Micah Jordan was trailing heading into the last period.The 157-pound weight class was a bit of a tough go for redshirt freshman Jake Ryan. After a first-round bye, Ryan was on the wrong end of a close 2-1 decision against Iowa’s Edwin Cooper Jr. Ryan won his next two matches, but he came up short against his last two opponents. The redshirt freshman ended the tournament in sixth place. The Buckeyes had two seventh-place finishers with senior Mark Martin and redshirt senior Johnni DiJulius. Neither wrestler was able to capture a Big Ten individual title in his tenure at OSU.Martin won two matches on the weekend, including the key bout to earn a seventh-place finish. The senior picked up a late takedown against Purdue’s Drake Stein, which gave Martin a 4-3 decision win. DiJulius fell to the seventh-place bracket after losing to Jordan Conaway of Penn State. Even so, the tournament ended on a high note for DiJulius with a 19-2 technical fall. The last two wrestlers from OSU finished in eighth. Both senior Kenny Courts and redshirt freshman Cody Burcher fought hard, but ultimately they couldn’t find the answer.Burcher earned a fall in his third match, and Courts picked up a major decision in his first match of the tournament.This is the fifth straight top-five finish for the Buckeyes as a team in the Big Ten tournament, and the seventh top-five finish overall for the Scarlet and Gray under coach Tom Ryan. OSU will now set its sights on the NCAA national championships in New York City. The tournament is scheduled to be held from March 17 to 19 at Madison Square Garden in New York City. read more

28 09 19

The Ohio State football team prepares to run onto the field prior to the first game of the 2016 season against Bowling Green on Sept. 3 at Ohio Stadium. The Buckeyes won 77-10. Credit: Alexa Mavrogianis | Photo EditorThe idea that “records don’t matter” when it comes to Ohio State and Michigan has been reiterated throughout the week by the Buckeyes. Redshirt senior center Pat Elflein knows all too well how much of a dogfight the matchups between the Buckeyes and the Spartans are.Since 2011, the Buckeyes are just 2-3 against Michigan State — the worst mark OSU has against any team throughout the past five years. During that time, the Scarlet and Gray have never played in Spartan Stadium as a top-five team.That is, until Saturday. Elflein, among others, said the 3-7 record for Mark Dantonio’s team is nothing if not a ruse. A hot topic for OSU coach Urban Meyer this week has been how important competing for a Big Ten title — something OSU might not do this season — is for making a playoff case. Meyer, of course, deflected the question, and said he had not discussed the issue with his team.“Just want to beat Michigan State, man,” he said. “It means a lot.”Looking back through the past five years, that statement has been easier said than done.2011: Michigan State 10 – Ohio State 7In the wake of TattooGate, the Buckeyes lost long-time coach Jim Tressel and multiple players. In Luke Fickell’s interim head coaching stint, OSU came into the game against the Spartans at 3-1, with a loss to the University of Miami. The Buckeyes were simply outclassed in Ohio Stadium, as they failed to average more than a yard rushing on 39 attempts. Even with three forced turnovers, just 178 yards of offense and 82 yards of penalties suffocated OSU. OSU finished the year 6-7 without any real notable wins, except for a 33-29 victory over Wisconsin, who went on to win the Big Ten title. Next year, Meyer became the head coach for OSU, much to the excitement of Buckeye fans.2012: Ohio State 17 – Michigan State 16Meyer’s tenure started with a bang. After jumping out to a 4-0 start, the Buckeyes traveled to their first away game of the season. The Spartans proved to be a tough draw.It took a 314 total-yard performance from Braxton Miller to do it, and a 63-yard touchdown pass to Devin Smith to seal the deal. It was Michigan State’s second loss of the season.The Buckeyes never had a game as close as this one for the rest of the 2012 campaign, and OSU finished the year with a perfect 12-0 record. Due to ramifications from NCAA actions taken against the team after TattooGate, OSU was not bowl eligible.2013: Michigan State 34 – Ohio State 24 (Big Ten championship)After facing Michigan State for the two previous years in the regular season, the Buckeyes had to wait until the Big Ten title game to get a chance at Dantonio’s team. OSU was pushed to the limit for the second straight week after a 42-41 slugfest in the week prior with Michigan.The Buckeyes luck ran out, and Meyer suffered his first loss as OSU’s coach.Connor Cook torched the Scarlet and Gray defense with 304 yards and three touchdowns, while Jeremy Langfield pounded the ball up the middle against a relatively stout OSU rush defense. A late Langford touchdown run put Michigan State up by 10, and the Spartans never looked back.Defensive shortcomings mixed with a lack of an OSU passing game (eight completions for 101 yards) gave the Spartans the Big Ten title. The Buckeyes had to wait until early November of 2014 to get redemption.2014: Ohio State 49 – Michigan State 37The injury of Braxton Miller before the 2014 season began was supposed to doom the Buckeyes. That was until a little-known redshirt freshman quarterback by the name of J.T. Barrett trotted onto the field for OSU.Barrett, who had led the team to a 7-1 mark when OSU traveled to East Lansing, played one of his best games of his short career to that point. Piling up 300 yards through the air with three touchdowns, paired with a 154-yard, two touchdown performance for Ezekiel Elliott, the Buckeyes walked away from Spartan Stadium one win richer.The win was an upset, with OSU coming into the game at No. 14 and Michigan State at No. 8. A good showing against the Spartans helped propel the Buckeyes into Big Ten and eventually national championship contention.2015: Michigan State 17 – Ohio State 14With repeat title hopes on their mind, the Buckeyes struggled to find continuity at the quarterback position. Swapping between Barrett and Cardale Jones, who helped the team win a national championship following an injury to Barrett against Michigan in 2014, Meyer could not decide who should have led the team.With the decision made for Barrett to start, OSU’s offense floundered. Elliott touched the ball just 12 times, and Barrett threw for just 46 yards. Two turnovers for the Buckeye defense still wasn’t enough to bring home a win. Tyler O’Connor, Michigan State’s starting quarterback for this season, replaced an injured Connor Cook and managed the game to the best of his abilities. A game-winning field goal by Michael Geiger is an image most OSU fans have yet to let go, especially the windmill celebration the kicker did down the sideline after nailing the kick to top OSU.2016With title hopes on the line again for OSU, and Michigan State looking to save face following a disappointing season so far, fans in attendance should be ready for some fireworks in Spartan Stadium. OSU’s run game should dictate the pace of play, while the Silver Bullets might be able to grab a few turnovers. read more

28 09 19

Led by its defense, the Ohio State men’s hockey team bounced back to take two points from No. 2 Miami (Ohio) and secure home ice in the playoffs.After being mauled in Oxford, Ohio, Friday night, the Buckeyes bounced back from the 6-2 loss to get a shootout victory Saturday in Columbus.When a game goes to a shootout it is officially scored as a tie, but Buckeye goaltender Dustin Carlson said after the game that “I feel like it’s a win, not a tie.”Carlson was the star for the Buckeyes as he shut out Miami through regulation, overtime and the shootout.“He responded well from [Friday] night,” coach John Markell said of his goaltender. In one of the best games of his career, Carlson finished the game with 38 saves.“At the drop of the puck I just knew I was into it right away,” Carlson said. He also attributed a lot of the Buckeyes’ success to the play of the defense, which he attributed to better communication.Junior Peter Boyd, who scored the Buckeyes second shootout goal, also acknowledged the improved play of the defense.“We had guys blocking shots and making sacrifices,” Boyd said. “I think [Shane] Sims had eight blocks tonight.”While the game was low on scoring, it certainly didn’t lack intensity.“Playing back-to-back nights against your rival, that’s pretty intense,” Miami coach Enrico Blasi said.Four players were penalized for roughing after the whistle, including OSU’s John Albert and Miami’s Curtis McKenzie at the end of overtime.The penalty against Albert looked to be costly as he is one of the usual shooters for the Buckeyes in a shootout situation, but was unable to participate due to penalty. The Buckeyes were, however, unaffected as both Sergio Somma and Peter Boyd lit the lamp for the Buckeyes, which was more than enough for Carlson.Carlson saved both attempts he faced, securing a 2-0 shootout win for the Buckeyes. Carlson has now saved the past 11 attempts he has faced in shootouts as his confidence continues to grow.“Right now is probably the best I’ve felt all season, playing in five games in a row now,” Carlson said.The shootout victory earned the Buckeyes two key points in their final game of the season and ensured home ice for the first round of the conference tournament. The Buckeyes finish the regular season in eighth place in the Central Collegiate Hockey Association and will host ninth place Notre Dame next weekend.Next weekend’s series will come with a change of scenery for the Buckeyes. The games will be played at the OSU Ice Rink, instead of the Schottenstein Center where the team played its regular season games. But for the Buckeyes it is a welcomed change.“I’m excited about it,” Carlson said. “We practice over there every day, so we know the ice very well. I also like the small barn, it’s not going to take too many of our fans to pack it. Last year when we played Bowling Green the atmosphere was great and hopefully we feed off of that.” read more

28 09 19

INDIANAPOLIS — There’s something about Northwestern, something that inevitably leads to a hotly contested showdown. Whenever they’re scheduled to play the Buckeyes, they’re bound to clash. On Jan. 29, the Buckeyes just barely hung on to a one-point lead and were able to secure the victory, 58-57. Two years ago in Evanston, Ill., then freshman Wildcat John Shurna drilled a last second 3-point attempt to give Northwestern the victory, 72-69. Consider today’s contest the rubber match. It took extra basketball and a monstrous effort by two members of the dynamic freshman trio, but the Buckeyes were able to pull-off the victory, 67-61. While the seniors, along with junior guard William Buford, struggled in the quarterfinals of the Big Ten tournament, freshmen Aaron Craft and Jared Sullinger had huge days. “To come in here for their first Big Ten tournament and play at the level they played at, I looked out there at times and we had three freshmen on the floor,” coach Thad Matta said. “Thirty-two games into it, they’re pretty accustomed to just about anything.” Sullinger had a gigantic performance on the glass, pulling in 18 boards to go along with his 20-point performance. His 18 rebounds were one shy of tying the Big Ten tournament record at 19. “Towards the end of the game they kind of went small, especially in overtime,” Sullinger said. “So we decided to, because they had Shurna guarding me, and obviously Shurna has 60 pounds less than me, we started going to me from there and free throws are just mentality.” Sullinger didn’t have a great day from the field, but the charity stripe was more than generous. Sully hit 16-of-18 from the line, including a perfect 10-for-10 in overtime. “After practice we always shoot 25 and then after we break the huddle I shoot 25 more. I’ve been shooting free throws for the last two weeks after practice,” Sullinger said. Not to be outdone by his star teammate, Craft also hit the glass hard, pulling in seven boards. It’s a good thing too, because the Buckeyes shot just 32 percent from the field, including 3-for-15 from beyond the arc for a 20-percent shooting percentage from deep. When asked how he’s able to come up big in big games despite his inexperience at the college level, Craft deflected all attention onto his teammates and coaches. “I’ve definitely benefited from the coaching staff we have, and the seniors we have,” Craft said. “They’ve always been there, no matter if we’re up or we’re down, in practice or in games. The Wildcats like to slow down the tempo and force opponents to play their preferred style and pace, something they’ve used effectively in both games this season. “It’s definitely something we knew they were going to do coming in. It was very successful the first time we played them, and it was pretty successful today,” Craft said. Former Buckeye Clark Kellogg predicted strong play from the young Buckeyes early in the week. “Craft, Sullinger and Thomas, all of them are special in their own way and they’ve done a marvelous job, all three of them,” Kellogg told The Lantern on Wednesday. “That’s who you’ve gone with all year, you can’t change that now. There is some pretty good, solid senior leadership to balance out whatever being a freshman might mean in the tournament. But those kids are unique; they’re competitive and talented.” read more

28 09 19

Aaron Craft knows the Ohio State basketball team needs another scorer. Outside of junior forward Deshaun Thomas, the Buckeyes don’t have another proven option to put the ball in the hole on a consistent basis. Against Albany Sunday, Craft tried – and succeeded – in fulfilling that void. He hit a career-high five 3-pointers on his way to 20 points and seven assists in OSU’s 82-60 victory. To be fair, fellow junior guard Lenzelle Smith, Jr. also chipped in 18 points and sophomore forward LaQuinton Ross scored 10 in addition to Thomas’ 19, but Craft was the most consistent option. It’s something Matta hinted was coming in the preseason and Craft said he’s been working on all summer. “He spent a lot of time in the gymnasium,” Matta said. “Aaron is such a smart kid. He knows what this team needs and having another guy that can put the ball in the basket is obviously something this team needs.” Before the game, Craft warmed up differently than he has in previous years. Instead of taking set shots, the vast majority of his pregame reps simulated a situation where he’d come off a screen, catch the ball in stride and fire up a quick jumper. The junior guard was comfortable taking shots from standstill positions last year, but the ability to catch and shoot coming off screens is something Craft said adds another dimension to his game. “That was the biggest thing we tried to work on, just shooting behind screens and things like that,” Craft said. “Teammates got to trust me to shoot the ball as well. So throughout the summer, throughout the fall, just trying to get their confidence in me as well.” Albany coach Will Brown said that if Craft can score like he did Sunday, it makes the Buckeyes a different animal offensively. “Like I said to my staff coming into the game, if Craft hits five or six threes then it wasn’t meant to be, and sure enough he hit five threes. You know he’s going to play in the NBA for 10 years,” Brown said. “If Craft is scoring on that level he did tonight – I know it will be a lot tougher in the Big Ten – but he just keeps getting better every year. He’s already the best defensive guard in the country.” The Buckeyes are looking for more than just another scoring option though. With the departure of former Buckeye big man Jared Sullinger to the NBA, Matta is searching for a dominant presence inside. Senior forward Evan Ravenel and sophomore forward Amir Williams received the most playing time Sunday, but did not have much production. In a combined 31 minutes of playing time, the pair collaborated for zero points and six rebounds. “We were on them at halftime for rebounding. Amir and Evan played 20 minutes in the first half and had a combined three rebounds,” said Matta, who added he would like to see them get more involved offensively. Brown said the center position is key to the Buckeyes’ future. “I think if they get any consistency from the five spot, the center spot, they can go very, very far this year,” he said. It might not be safe to take too much away from the Buckeyes’ performance Sunday, though. Albany plays in the America East Conference and, as Brown openly admitted, is nowhere near the Buckeyes in terms of talent and athleticism. “(OSU’s) got McDonald’s All-Americans coming off the bench,” he said. “My guys go to McDonald’s to eat.” OSU is scheduled to play Rhode Island on Saturday in Uncasville, Conn., at 5 p.m. read more

28 09 19

Lantern File PhotoOSU redshirt junior cornerback Bradley Roby pumps up the crowd before a game against Miami (OH) on Sept. 1 at Ohio Stadium. OSU won, 56-10.The charge against Ohio State redshirt junior cornerback Bradley Roby has been downgraded to disorderly conduct from battery, according to the Monroe County Prosecutor’s Office.Roby was involved in an altercation at a bar in Bloomington, Ind. on July 21 where he was initially charged with misdemeanor battery. The date of the pretrial hearing remains Aug. 26, according to the Prosecutor’s Office.OSU coach Urban Meyer has not suspended Roby for the incident, but he has been practicing with the team during fall camp in preparation for the season.The maximum punishment for a disorderly conduct charge is 180 days in jail and a $1,000 fine in Indiana.It remains to be seen if Roby will take part in the teams Aug. 31 season opener at home against Buffalo.OSU and Roby did not respond to The Lantern’s request for comment. read more

28 09 19

Johnnie Dixon (1) is lifted into the air by A.J. Alexander (88) after Dixon’s touchdown during the second half of the Buckeyes game against Rutgers on Oct. 1. The Buckeyes won 58-0. Credit: Mason Swires | Former Assistant Photo EditorOhio State will be without redshirt sophomore tight end A.J. Alexander in the fall after the backup injured his knee, which required surgery and will cause him to miss the 2017 season, a team spokesman confirmed to The Lantern on Friday.The news was first reported by Tim May of the Columbus Dispatch.The tight end was injured after spring practice had concluded and has already undergone surgery, according to the spokesman.Alexander played in all 13 games for Ohio State last season, catching four passes for 27 yards.During spring practice, Alexander saw an increased role in the offense while redshirt senior tight end Marcus Baugh rehabilitated after undergoing shoulder surgery.Ohio State’s three redshirt sophomore tight ends – Luke Farrell, Jake Hausmann and Kierre Hawkins – will likely take larger roles in the offense given the void Alexander leaves. read more

28 09 19

The Ohio State women’s volleyball team celebrates after defeating No. 4 Penn State in four sets on Sept. 23. Credit: Miranda Lipton | Lantern ReporterAfter recovering from a 2-0 deficit, the Ohio State women’s volleyball team (10-6, 1-3 Big Ten) fell to Maryland (11-5, 2-2 Big Ten) in five sets (25-22, 25-22, 15-25, 22-25, 17-15) on Saturday night. Freshman opposite hitter Vanja Bukilić topped both teams with a career-high 19 kills and 19.5 points. Junior middle blocker Madison Smeathers contributed 13 kills and redshirt sophomore middle blocker Jordan Fry struck nine. Sophomore middle blocker Lauren Witte had eight kills, seven blocks and two aces and Junior outside hitter Ana Beatriz Franklin nailed three aces.Sophomore setter Becca Mauer clocked 48 assists, 13 digs and five blocks for her third straight double-double. Sophomore defensive specialize Hannah Gruensfelder had a team-best 20 digs.The Buckeyes had an initial lead in the first set and were up 12-11. The score remained tight throughout the set but Maryland closed the set at 25-22. Ohio State also started the second set off strong, managing a lead throughout the set until the Terrapins tied the score at 17-all and continued to win the set 25-22. Ohio State came back strong in the following two sets, leading with a wide gap throughout the set before a 25-15 win.  They continued this trend into the fourth set with a steady lead and while the Terps nearly caught up at the end, the Buckeyes clinched the set with a 25-22 final score. Ohio State still got ahead in the fifth set and were up 13-12 before the Terps tied the score, eventually winning the set and the match at 17-15. The Buckeyes get back on the road to visit Rutgers on Friday, Oct. 5 at 7 p.m. read more

25 09 19

first_imgScotland’s public services have only been able to emerge from the collapse in North Sea oil prices because of the UK’s “broad shoulders”, Theresa May has said. The Prime Minister said that the fall in oil prices and tax revenues shows how “crucial” the union is to Scotland’s future in an attack on plans for a second independence referendumShe accused the SNP of allowing the richest to “flourish with ease” and “flout the rules with impunity” while the majority of families are left feeling like “the wind is against them”. She added that Scotland is well placed to exploit the opportunities of Brexit: “As we strike that deal, we have an exciting chance to forge a new role in the world. Scotland’s status will not be diminished by that; it will be enhanced.”We will go out into the world with the aim of being a leader in global free trade, one that makes the most of our advantages, from the financial expertise of Edinburgh to the shipbuilding prowess of the Clyde and the globally renowned food and drink produce of Scotland’s countryside.”She said that as the second party in Scotland the conservatives will hold the SNP to account as she praised Ruth Davidson, the leader of the Scottish Conservatives, as a “real shining light” in British politics.She said: “The focus at our conference will not just be on striking a better deal with the rest of the world as we strengthen our own union here at home. It will be on getting a better deal for people in the UK. “Because the EU referendum also exposed an underlying sense that people felt they have been ignored by politicians, at Westminster and Holyrood, for too long.”These are the people who get up early, put in the hours, play by the rules, yet still feel like the wind is against them. “They’re getting by – but only just. Meanwhile, those at the top seem to flourish with ease, and often flout the rules with impunity.”That feeling is as strong in Scotland as it is anywhere else in the UK, and after nine years as the establishment party in Scotland, the SNP needs to accept its share of responsibility.” She insisted that she will strike a Brexit deal that will “enhance” Scotland’s place in the world rather than diminish it.She said on Facebook: “It has become even clearer in recent months that the union which really matters to Scotland’s future is its union with England, Wales and Northern Ireland, our centuries-long ties of people, trade, history, culture and values. “The fall in oil prices demonstrates just how crucial that relationship is financially: Scotland was able to weather that downturn because of the UK’s broad shoulders.”Tax revenues from the North Sea collapsed, but funding for Scottish public services remained unscathed. That is how our union works: we share each other’s successes when times are good, and shoulder each other’s burdens when times are tough.”center_img Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings.last_img read more

25 09 19

first_imgOn our way to @selasigb and his #GBBO party – best way to watch! @RavSBansal @LouBaraDa @katebarmby @michaelgeo96 @kate_gilliford pic.twitter.com/wsxF3FFybf— Thomas Gilliford (@Tom_gilliford) October 26, 2016 He even sent cars to pick them all up Massive congratulations to @CJ_Brownie – our amazing #GBBO champion pic.twitter.com/CPpPqv7FEZ— Thomas Gilliford (@Tom_gilliford) October 26, 2016  And they were all really pleased for Candice  It was a party full of happy friends Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. Having to bake fiendishly difficult creations in a tent, while trying to avoid Sue accidentally elbowing your cake or a fellow contestant stealing your custard seems like it would breed tension and animosity between the bakers.However, the opposite appears to have been the case this year in the tent, with all the bakers supporting each other. They see each other still even after the show ended. Selasi gives Andrew rides on his motorbike and has traveled across the country to visit Val. Candice has been to visit Louise, and Andrew and Tom have fast become friends. Selasi proved what great friends the bakers all are by hosting a viewing party on Wednesday night to which all contestants were invited.And as they are all social-media savvy, there is plenty of evidence on social media. Look on, friends, and pretend you were there. Selasi knows how to throw a partyJust look at all that pizza…  And posted party outfit inspiration on Instagram What a fantastic winner, montage at the end had me in tears. Go Candice. Go bakers of 2016 #gbbo 😄🙌🏻— Andrew Smyth (@cakesmyth) October 26, 2016 Best people in the world to watch #GBBO final with pic.twitter.com/64rwPUokWF— Thomas Gilliford (@Tom_gilliford) October 26, 2016 Well done my lovely friend, I can’t wait to see what you do next xxx #gbbo https://t.co/cYHgmN6E6c— Kate Barmby (@katebarmby) October 27, 2016  They even had dinner together the evening before, and this is what Val said about it”Having dinner with friends it is so natural and lovely to sit here and listen into their laughter and chatter”.  And it doesn’t stop there – Candice and Jane are going on a baking road trip together, and it looks like the others are going to continue to see each other as well.Maybe they should write a joint cook book! . @selasigb here we come! #GBBOFinal pic.twitter.com/rv7qmUVRif— Kate Barmby (@katebarmby) October 26, 2016 Val practiced her moves for Ayia Napa Having dinner with friends it is so natural and lovely to sit here and listen into their laughter and chatter pic.twitter.com/Vkfr3FGvFn— Valerie Ann Stones (@valstones) October 25, 2016  What a lovely group of friends! I am grateful thankful and honoured! What a crazy few months! You will never know what’s this means to me! 12bakers now friends #GBBO ❤️— Candice Brown (@CJ_Brownie) October 26, 2016 My favourite @valstones getting her steps in #GBBOFinal pic.twitter.com/p2qa1jXnNg— Louise Williams (@LouBaraDa) October 26, 2016 We’ll all miss the bakers of 2016. Candice and Liam you are both such a great couple a well deserved win 😘👍 https://t.co/CQicJMm2gK— Valerie Ann Stones (@valstones) October 26, 2016last_img read more

25 09 19

first_imgThe “Cecil Rhodes effect” is creating a chilling atmosphere around the country, experts fear, after it emerged that Queen Mary University of London quietly removed a foundation stone laid by King Leopold II amid student complaints that he was a “genocidal colonialist”.Within weeks of the launch of a petition by the university’s Pan-African Society calling for the foundation stone and commemorative plaque to be taken down, the institution’s authorities yielded to the activists’ demands.King Leopold II, who was a first cousin of Queen Victoria, ruled Belgium from 1865 to 1909. He founded the Congo Free State, now the Democratic of Congo, where he forced natives to work as labourers on rubber plantations. The petition, launched in June, said the plaques should be removed from their “uncritical” place in the Octagon Building and “relocated to a museum…dedicated to the memorialisation of the crimes of genocide, colonialism and imperialism.” King Leopold II of Belgium (1835 – 1909)Credit:Getty Images Dr Joanna Williams, whose book  Academic Freedom in an Age of Conformity was published earlier this year, said: “When universities start removing plaques and statues on the basis of student petitions, without any broader debate or discussion, where and when do they draw the line?“There are very few who have a completely untarnished record when you start looking back through history.“Roads are named after people, streets are named after people – if you start saying you have to have a completely unblemished past to have something named after you, you could argue that every single building and road would be renamed across the country.” Oxford University student campaigned to remove a statue of Cecil RhodesCredit:Eddie Mulholland “The size and prominence of these inscriptions suggested a strength of association that was never the case, and as such the decision was taken to remove both from view.” A plaque removed from Queen Mary's Oxtagonal Building earlier this year following student protests Harvard Law School replaced  its official crest, because of its links to an 18th-century slave owner, following five months of demonstrations and sit-ins by students. The Octagon Building, Queen Mary UniversityCredit:Queen Mary University The “Leopold Must Fall” campaign at Queen Mary is one of a string of student movements calling for universities to sever ties with individuals and objects associated with colonialism. Earlier this year, Oxford University refused to give into calls from the “Rhodes Must Fall” campaign to tear down a statue of Cecil Rhodes from Oriel College over his links with Britain’s colonial past. However, other universities have been quicker to give into student demands. Jesus College at Cambridge University took down a bronze cockerel statue which had been looted during a British colonial expedition to Nigeria in the 19th century, after students asked for it to be repatriated.center_img Dr Williams,  senior lecturer  in higher education at the University of Kent, said that universities were now so quick to respond to student demands that they were losing their ability to “hold the line”. The actions of Queen Mary University of London set a dangerous precedent of universities giving in to students and “whitewashing” history, she said. “It suggests a fear within the university authorities – as if they are scared of the students and pander to their demands to avoid attracting negative attention.” A plaque removed from Queen Mary’s Octagonal Building earlier this year following student protestsCredit:Jacqueline Banerjee Oxford University student campaigned to remove a statue of Cecil Rhodes Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. Just a month later, the university told students that it had removed them “as part of ongoing refurbishment work” to the Octagon Library.Emma Bull, director of student services at the university, told the leaders of the student protest at the time: “Queen Mary University has no historical ties with King Leopold, other than he visited Mile End in April 1887, and then returned to lay the Foundation Stone in June 1887. The Octagon Building, Queen Mary University King Leopold II of Belgiumlast_img read more

25 09 19

first_imgOur manifesto: Real political insight, free for 30 days.Rely on unrivalled insight and sharp analysis from our stellar team of Westminster insiders.Join the most trusted voice in politics. Follow Election 2017 with Telegraph Premium.Start your no obligation, 30 day free trial today. He was first elected as MP for Banff and Buchan in 1987 and represented the seat in the north-east of Scotland until 2010. He has been the MP for Gordon for the last two years.Defeat will be a huge personal blow for such a “weel kent” face in British politics, and comes just three years after he lost the 2014 independence referendum, which led to his resignation as first minister. The SNP also lost Angus Robertson, the SNP’s Westminster leader and another high-profile figure, who was defeated by Douglas Ross in the north-east of Scotland, where fishermen have angrily opposed the SNP’s bid to stay in the EU. Mr Ross overturned a majority of 9,065 to defeat Mr Robertson by 4,200 votes in Moray.The SNP’s Tasmina Ahmed-Sheikh, a rising star in the party, a close ally of Mr Salmond, and its international trade spokesman, lost her lost Ochil and South Perthshire to the Tories, who were a distant third in 2015. tasmina He also warned voters that he might not be ready for a quiet retirement in Strichen, rural Aberdeenshire, borrowing the words of a famous Jacobite song, Bonnie Dundee, written by Walter Scott in 1825, to make the point.Slightly misquoting the line in the process, he said: “So laugh, false whigs, in the midst of your glee/ You have not seen the last of my bonnets and me.”The actual line, towards the end of the song popularised by the Scottish folk group The Corries, is: “And tremble, false whigs, in the midst of your glee/ Ye hae no seen the last o’ my bonnets and me”. Mike Weir, meanwhile, the chief whip, and an SNP MP for Angus since 200,1 who increased his majority by 8,000 votes just two years ago, was defeated by Tory unknown Kirstene Hair, who took more than 45 per cent of the vote. A disastrous night for the SNP saw it lose its “biggest beast”, Alex Salmond, along with its Westminster leader, its chief whip and its international trade spokesman.The loss of 21 seats, after a high-water mark just two years ago when it took 56 of Scotland’s 59 seats, is a major blow to the party, to Nicola Sturgeon’s leadership and to her ambitions for a second Scottish independence vote.Mr Salmond, the party’s foreign affairs spokesman, Scotland’s first minister between 2007 and 2014 and an MP for 25 years, saw a majority of nearly 8,700 overturned by the Tory candidate Colin Clark as the Conservatives increased their share of the vote in Gordon by 29 per cent.His defeat at the age of 62 comes after a remarkable political career in which he has also been leader of the SNP for more than 20 years, in two separate terms, and an MSP for 11 years. However, the SNP veteran was typically bullish in his concession speech, saying the reduced number of MPs would still be in a position of “very substantial influence indeed”, which would be used in a bid to keep the Tories from power. Angus Robertson, a loser in MorayCredit:Getty Tasmina Ahmed-Sheikh failed to hold on to Ochil and South PerthshireCredit:Getty Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. angus robertson Mr Weir, a former solicitor, has held a string of party spokesman roles in Westminster, on business, environment, health and trade and industry.Good news was in short supply for the SNP, but came in the form of two closely contested seats, with Pete Wishart, Scotland’s longest serving MP, winning by just 21 votes from the Tories in Perth and North Perthshire, and Stephen Gethins, the SNP’s Europe spokesman, holding off a Lib Dem challenge by a remarkable two votes in North East Fife. That result was a far cry from 2015 when he defeated Sir Menzies Campbell with a 4,344 majority.last_img read more

25 09 19

first_imgMs Newman inherits the estate under the terms of the 7th Baron’s will, made before he died in 1941. It stated that if any Lord Braybrooke failed to produce a male heir, the estate should revert to his line. She is his granddaughter. “It seems rather hard on Amanda. She’s lived and worked there all her adult life,” Julian Fellowes told the Sunday Times. Mrs Murray has previously said the law is “discriminatory” and that she was already “doing a man’s job” in running the estate. “It boils down to this,” she said. “If I was a boy, I would be sitting pretty. In Downton Abbey, cousin Matthew Crawley becomes the heir to the estate of the Earl of GranthamCredit:NICK BRIGGS/ITV The creator of Downton Abbey has criticised inheritance laws after a baron’s daughter lost her father’s title and land. Lord Fellowes of West Stafford said that Amanda Murray, 55, daughter of Baron Braybrooke, had been unfairly penalised by laws in the peerage which prioritise male heirs.  Robin Neville, the 10th Baron Braybrooke, died last week, leaving seven daughters – but none of them will inherit his title or the 6,000-acre Audley End estate in Essex.Instead, the title goes to a distant cousin, Richard Neville, 40, director of Bring a Bottle, a price comparison site for alcohol, and the estate to Louise Newman, 56, an art historian. Lord Braybrooke outside Audley End House “My poor father had no son; just lots of daughters. In this day and age, with supposed equality, why am I not allowed to inherit my father’s estate?” In Downton, cousin Matthew Crawley becomes the heir to the estate of the Earl of Grantham The situation was dubbed the “real-life Downton” because of its similarities to a storyline in the TV show Downton Abbey, in which a distant male cousin becomes the heir to an Earl who has three daughters but no sons. The Royal laws of succession were changed in 2013 ahead of the birth of Prince George, and are now gender-neutral. But Fellowes said changing the peerage rules to match was not an easy fix.“Simply making the peerage…the equivalent of the royal family would create a great chaos for many families…whose sons have for 30, 40, 50 years made the assumption of inheriting. One can’t just brush them aside,” he said. Fellowes has previously said it was “outrageous” that his wife, Emma, a descendant of Earl Kitchener, the famous First World War field marshal, had no right to inherit the title when the third Earl, who was childless, died in 2011. Lord Braybrooke outside Audley End House Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings.last_img read more

25 09 19

first_imgThe Pet Card is designed to make sure that medics or 999 crews know if a pet is at risk of being left alone because their owner is unwell  Bridgette said “When speaking to members of the local community, I came to realise that I wasn’t the only one who’d ever considered who would look after my pet if anything ever happened to me.”As such, I thought the ‘Pet Card’ was the perfect solution to put minds at rest and I’m thrilled that they’re being distributed nationwide.” Elderly pet owners are being urged to carry ‘Pet Cards’ to prevent animals being left alone if they are taken ill. The wallet-sized, organ-donor style card, created by Co-op Funeralcare, carries details of who medics or 999 crews can contact if the owner is ill or injured and ensures any four legged, furry or feathered friends are looked after.Co-op Funeral Arranger, Bridgette Perks, from Armthorpe, Doncaster, when she realised a lot of her clients were worried about what would happen to their pets if ever they didn’t come home. Rather than direct them to rescue or re-homing centres, Bridgette took it upon herself to start creating ‘Pet Cards’ for the local residents of Armthorpe.Her idea proved to be a success, leading to Co-op Funeralcare rolling them out nationwide. The complimentary cards will be distributed in local communities as the nation is urged to take the simple precautionary measure to ensure their domestic companions are never left alone. The Pet Card is designed to make sure that medics or 999 crews know if a pet is at risk of being left alone because their owner is unwell Credit:epa european pressphoto agency b.v. / Alamy Stock Photocenter_img Helen Chandler, head of funeral operations at Co-op Funeralcare, said: ‘We always support our colleagues in any way we can so when we heard about Bridgette’s great idea there was no doubt that we wanted to roll it out in our Funeral homes across the UK.”We’re always keen to find new ways to support the local community and the introduction of ‘Pet Cards’ will hopefully offer piece of mind to those who need it.”David Hampson, head of pet insurance, said: “Pets are often considered to be one of the family and the thought of them being left alone can be concerning to say the least. Carrying a ‘Pet Card’ is a simple solution to ensure any pet is made aware of if anything were to happen to the owner.”We want to help customers to take responsibility for their pet’s wellbeing and this is a great way to ensure your pet will get the care it needs in the case of an emergency.” Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings.last_img read more

25 09 19

first_imgJack Adcock Jack AdcockCredit:Family Handout/PA MPS medical director Dr Rob Hendry, said: “The public and medical profession would expect that extreme cases where there is intent to cause harm or a high degree of recklessness result in prosecution – and we support that. “Most medical manslaughter cases are however more complex, involve systems failures, and are devastating for all concerned.”Dr Bawa-Garba’s conviction is a case in point, and the strength of feeling on this and its implications for an open, learning culture in healthcare, has been palpable.”A striking feature of the law in England and Wales is that intent, carelessness, or recklessness is not required for a conviction.”The legal bar is too low and it is hard to see who benefits – a family has lost a loved one through tragic circumstances, a doctor may lose their career and face a prison sentence, the NHS has lost a valuable doctor, and fear of personal recrimination becomes increasingly embedded across healthcare.”Opportunities to reform the law surrounding medical manslaughter have not been seized.”The organisation recommends the law moves in line with the legal test for culpable homicide used in Scotland,  which requires an act to be “intentional, reckless or grossly careless”.The Government review is being led by the former president of the Royal College of Surgeons, Sir Norman Williams.center_img The legal bar for convicting healthcare professionals of manslaughter is currently “too low”, a medical defence organisation has said. The Medical Protection Society say that a “striking feature” of the law in England and Wales is that “intent, carelessness, or recklessness” is not required for a conviction, and that opportunities to reform the law “have not been seized”.Their comments come in response to a Government review into the use of gross negligence manslaughter in healthcare following the handling of the case of Dr Hadiza Bawa-Garba.Dr Bawa-Garba was found guilty of gross negligence manslaughter in 2015 over the death of six-year-old Jack Adcock, after he developed sepsis in 2011.A tribunal decided that she should remain on the medical register despite the conviction but in January the General Medical Council (GMC) succeeded in getting Dr Bawa-Garba erased from the register after taking the case to the High Court.However, many doctors reacted angrily to the GMC’s measures, raising  concerns that many of the issues raised by the case – such as dangerous levels of understaffing, failure of IT systems, and staff being forced to work in inappropriate conditions – had been ignored. Last month,  the Government launched the review in manslaughter cases.  Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings.last_img read more

25 09 19

Britain’s first official red light district has been branded a failure by one of its key architects amid speculation that the controversial scheme maybe on the brink of collapse.The local politician who helped mastermind the zone in Leeds admitted the women working the streets were still at risk of violence and neighbouring residents had seen a surge in sex and drug-taking in their streets, parks and woods, sometimes in full view of children. Kerb-crawling men are meanwhile evading prosecution from the police’s “hands-off” approach.A crisis meeting to be held between residents and the council, police and health chiefs on Tuesday will hear strong calls for the ending of the scheme. “Our argument is that it’s not appropriate to have girls bought and sold on our streets in 2018,” said Claire Bentley-Smith, a resident.Mark Dobson, the executive councillor who helped set up the zone, called for a major overhaul:  “Unless the scheme is seen to work, it will fail and it is failing.”Former international development secretary Hillary Benn, the local MP, has also said the scheme “is not working in its own terms” and has called for a “rethink.” “It was a disaster from day one. Other criminals came into the area quick as a flash. Drug dealers, pimps, even traffickers that brought the women from Romania… the women were given carte blanche and it was like there was a total amnesty on any of the scumbags buying and selling the girls,” added the officer.Leeds managed zone was created in October 2014 in the largely industrial district of Holbeck, with men free to kerb crawl for prostitutes in the area between 8pm and 6am. Sex in public, however, remained an offence against public decency.As a result, residents said it had turned into a “meet-and-greet” area with the prostitutes, 90 per cent of whom are drug addicts, and their clients decamping to neighbouring residential streets, parks and woodland to have sex, leaving behind condoms and syringes that have been found by children.The ward which includes the neighbouring residential area of Beeston as well as Holbeck has seen a doubling in reports of rapes and sexual assaults although council say this is result of increased reporting by the women. Local resident Claire Bentley-Smith set about taking action after her local primary school became scene to condoms, needles and soiled tissues discarded by prostitutesCredit:Charlotte Graham In contrast, A Nordic-style approach in Ipswich following the murder of five prostitutes in 2006 saw a ban on kerb-crawling clear the streets with nearly all of the women still out of prostitution, Brian Tobin, of the Iceni charity, told The Telegraph.  An independent evaluation by the University of East Anglia judged it a “clear and sustained success” in tackling kerb crawling and helping the women. Superintendent Kerry Cutler said they enacted a multi-agency approach to get women off the street “straight away” if they received any alerts about prostitutes, allied to zero tolerance of kerb crawling.By contrast, figures obtained by The Telegraph show the trade in prostitutes in Germany doubled in value to euros 14.6bn after legalisation in 2002, fuelled by an influx of migrants from Eastern Europe. Chloe, 23, a prostitute since she was 16 who was being “pimped” in Holbeck by her drug-dealing boyfriend told The Telegraph: “I don’t know why people think the zone would ever work. All it meant was the dirty bastards came there knowing that they could do anything they wanted to us and loads of men would come to gawp at us and laugh. That’s the bit I hated the most.”Rosa, 26, a prostitute since she was 18, said she was regularly asked for unprotected sex and was threatened with gang rape in front of a community police officer. The zone meant the men were “more cocky than usual because they don’t get arrested and still treat women like dirt,” she said.Last week a prostitute was run down by a client after a row over payment.Among complaints are:A prostitute injecting drugs into her groin in a car in a residential street in full view of a mother of a 14 year old and a drugged prostitute with no shoes on staggering into traffic on a snowy winter’s morning as mothers did their school runs.Businessman Ian Staines who was forced to close for a day just before Christmas at a cost of £10,000 in lost work after a prostitute was caught having sex against the wall of his firm’s building and claimed she had been raped, leading to the area being sealed off. He says he is calling the police three times a week to report breaches of the time limits on kerb crawling.Matthew Sullivan, a father of four who discovered his local wood carpeted with almost 100 discarded needles after seeing a punter disappear in to the trees to have sex. He also recounts a prostitute returning to have sex four times in the space of 12 hours with four different men on a park bench, in a car and in the woods behind his house.A spokesman for Safer Leeds said creation of the zone had led to an increase in reporting of crimes – rising from 7 per cent to 50 per cent reported to the National Ugly Mugs scheme as a result of which there had been “landmark” convictions of people who would otherwise have continued to offend. The data on offences also covered Beeston, which was not part of the managed area, he added. In Leeds, a senior police officer told The Telegraph the force had “given up” and was failing to find a way out of prostitution for the girls who are “dying because of being abused, the drugs and the booze while the punters go home to their wives to watch the football.” Local resident Claire Bentley-Smith He said it had made changes in response to residents’ complaints included a dedicated policing team and increased spending on cleaning. The scheme was under continuous review to meet its aims of finding a long-term solution afters of previous initiatives. “Further steps will be taken and further options considered as appropriate,” he said. Syphilis rates in the city have doubled since 2014, gonorrhoea has marginally increased and chlamydia among 15-24 year olds is up by 30 per cent, and is almost 75 per cent higher than the national rate, according to Public Health England. The prevalence of HIV has risen slightly although new diagnoses are down in line with the national trend. The red light district, launched in 2014, is at the heart of a national and international debate over the most effective way of regulating prostitution to combat trafficking, violence against women and high rates of sexual diseases including HIV. Organisations including Amnesty International, UNAIDS and the medical journal The Lancet called for decriminalisation of prostitution after a 2014 Lancet paper claimed it could slash HIV global rates by up to 46 per cent. However, the laissez faire model on which the forecast was based has been criticised for failing to factor in the possibility that demand for prostitution and trafficked women and girls would expand if the legislative lid was lifted.A Telegraph investigation in locations including Leeds, Bangladesh, Germany and Holland suggests the “hands-off” approach is unwinding fast, creating more harm than it prevents.It reflects a shift politically where a growing number of Tory and Labour MPs are pushing for the “Nordic model” of regulation to be introduced in Britain under which the buying of sex is made illegal while prostitutes are helped to escape the sex trade.The policy is already in place in countries including Ireland, Northern Ireland and France. Proponents say it reduces prostitution and cuts people trafficking as well as helping prostitutes exit the trade. [They] came there knowing they could do anything they wanted to usChloe, 23 As a result, Germany is introducing a new law enforcing mandatory health checks on prostitutes to combat rises in sexual diseases and bans on brothels advertising sex without a condom and on flat rate deals where men pay a fixed sum to have sex with as many women as they want in a day.Holland is also facing a backlash after trafficking trials, the first national protest against the exploitation of women in prostitution, rising gonorrhoea rates among prostitutes linked to unprotected oral sex and moves to introduce a new law to make it illegal to knowingly have sex with a trafficked woman.Additional reporting by Rory HannaProtect yourself and your family by learning more about Global Health Security  Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. Health experts say there has been a rise in sexual disease rates due to brothels actively advertising unprotected sex to punters. One of the biggest brothel owners is currently on trial for trafficking, exploitation of prostitutes, pimping and fraud. read more

25 09 19

Thousands of disabled children are being forced to wait months for a wheelchair amid “alarming” NHS failures, charities have warned.New figures reveal more than 5,000 cases in which those suffering from spinal injuries and other life-changing disabilities were left without the right equipment for months.Four years ago the NHS signed a wheelchair charter which promised that access and provision should be equal for all “irrespective of age or postcode”.But the new analysis shows one in five children in need of a wheelchair are waiting more than 18 weeks for it, with a postcode lottery in provision across the country.In some parts of the country less than one in three children in need of the equipment received it within this time. And the figures show waiting times lengthened for children with the highest needs, and those requiring specialist chairs.Campaigners said the failings meant children were being left stuck at home, unable to go to school – and in some cases forced into respite care because parents could not cope.Dave Bracher, campaigns manager at the Spinal Injuries Association, said: “These alarming statistics show a continued widespread postcode lottery that is affecting some of the most vulnerable disabled children in society, including those with spinal cord injuries.“These delays inevitably affect a child’s rehabilitation and daily life – such as attending school, contributing to family, and being with friends and therefore has significant long term consequences”. If a child doesn’t have the right chair it means they cannot go to schoolDame Tanni Grey-Thompson Around 82 per cent of eligible children received a wheelchair within 18 weeks in 2017-18, against a target of 92 per cent, according to the recently published official data. This was a slight improvement from 81 per cent in the previous year, but far off a target of 100 per cent set for next March. Children with high or specialist needs waited longer for wheelchairs in 2017-18 then they did in the year prior, the analysis by Health Service Journal shows.More than 4,200 children, two fifths of all those with high needs requiring wheelchairs, had to wait more than nine weeks in 2017-18 to receive their wheelchair once their needs had been assessed – a rise of around 6 per cent in a year.Children in Darlington, Rotherham, Portsmouth, South Lincolnshire, West Hampshire, Southampton, and West Suffolk were among those suffering the longest delays. These delays inevitably affect a child’s rehabilitation and daily lifeDave Bracher, Spinal Injuries Association Dame Tanni Grey-Thompson, the former Paralympian who campaigned for NHS England to adopt the wheelchair charter, said major improvements were needed.She said: “If a child doesn’t have the right chair it means they cannot go to school, it means children are harder to handle for parents, it means potentially more respite care.”A spokeswoman for NHS Clinical Commissioners said its guidance had sought to improve outcomes for patients needing wheelchairs “within the current financial context and demand pressures they are facing”.The CCGs with the worst delays said they were working with providers to improve performance.  An NHS England spokesman said: “The new target has been introduced to drive improvements in access to and availability of wheelchairs for children across every part of the country, however there will be cases for example where children chose bespoke wheelchairs which may take longer to arrive.” Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. read more

25 09 19

When Moliere’s Tartuffe was first performed in 1664 it was promptly banned due to its vicious satire of Catholicism.In order to guarantee that the latest Royal Shakespeare Company adaptation has a similar “edge”, the French farce about a charlatan priest who tricks his way into exploiting a wealthy family has been set in Birmingham’s Pakistani community, the protagonist a convert to Islam.Iqbal Khan, the director, admitted that satirising a Muslim cleric was “dangerous” and that they expected to alienate audiences.But he said it was felt that as a satire, it was important to update the context as far as possible.–– ADVERTISEMENT ––“This seems to be a play that really speaks to our present condition, he told BBC Radio 4’s Front Row.“It’s set against a religious hypocrite and that has to be dangerous, I think, and a Muslim cleric is obviously a slightly more dangerous context. Setting it in Birmingham… it allows us to be provocative and topical.” Gupta said the play explored various aspects of faith, focusing on Tartuffe who has “cloaked himself in religious robes” and is purporting to tell people the correct way to practice their religion. Amina Ziaas as Dadimaa Pervaiz on stage at The SwanCredit:Topher McGrillis/RSC Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. He added: “We thought it would be more divisive and might alienate more people than it seems to have done but they seem to have really recognised the truth of the situations we are representing on stage.”Anil Gupta, who co-wrote the adaptation alongside Richard Pinto, acknowledged that much of the play’s power is derived from the fact that it “makes the audience a bit uncomfortable”. Asif Khan as TartuffeCredit:Topher McGrillis/RSC He said that to have the desired effect, it needed to tread the same fine line between controversy and entertainment.Gupta, a television writer who has worked on hits such as The Office, the Kumars at No 42 and Goodness Gracious Me, wrote in an article for the RSC: “There has to be an edge, a line that everyone is wondering whether you are going to cross.“One of the privileges and purposes of comedy is to go into those areas that society is uncomfortable with and poke them with a stick.”He told Front Row that the dichotomy between Birmingham and “its posh neighbour” Stratford Upon Avon, where the play opened this week at the RSC’s Swan Theatre, was relevant.“I think there is a feeling that the RSC ought to be engaging with its neighbouring big conurbation and that people should be coming to see these plays,” he added.“They are right on their doorstep. Maybe we want to do more of these things where people see people like themselves up on the stage.” Asif Khan as Tartuffe Amina Ziaas as Dadimaa Pervaiz on stage at The Swan “One of the messages, of the play, which isn’t our message, its Moliere’s message, is that  you don’t need someone how to tell you how to be a good Catholic or a good Muslim – that’s between you and God,” he added.Khan insisted that the play is not a critique of any faith but a “retreat from complexity and contradiction in those who feel disempowered or lost.”He told the Telegraph they had been “very careful” to make a distinction between those with a sincere belief in Islam and the Qu’ran and those who manipulate it to serve their own agenda.“Imran, the patriarch, who is most susceptible, is a man struggling with grief and failing to provide guidance for his children and family,” he said.“Ultimately, one hopes that the audience feels some compassion for this man and are wary of the ‘branders of truth’ as represented by Tartuffe.” read more

25 09 19

Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. Commuters and football fans should have their blood pressure tested at train stations and stadiums, the British Heart Foundation has suggested. The leading charity has called on health services to provide free-to-use machines at train stations, supermarkets and football grounds across the country. It comes as new research suggests improved diagnosis and treatment of high blood pressure could prevent 11,500 heart attacks, strokes and other cases of heart and circulatory disease every year .The treatment of blood pressure – which affects nearly 30 per cent of adults in the UK – has been highlighted as the ‘next frontier’ in reducing deaths related to these issues, a spokesman for the British Heart Foundation said. England falls behind the standards of other western countries, such as the United States, Canada and Sweden in terms of early detection of high blood pressure, according to the charity.Making the call yesterday, Simon Gillespie, chief executive of the British Heart Foundation, said the move was crucial for effective treatment of those suffering from high blood pressure.“It is key that high blood pressure is detected out in the community, and not just in GP surgeries. This means making sure that people can have their blood pressure checked in train stations, supermarkets and even football grounds. The more convenient it becomes, the more likely it is people will be diagnosed and treated,” he said. The charity calculated the figure of 11,500 by projecting Canada’s rates for diagnosis and treatment of high blood pressure on to UK statistics. Prevention rates in Canada improved dramatically in the 1990s after the introduction of volunteer-led blood pressure checks in the community as well as in pharmacies. Diagnosis rates for people with high blood pressure in Canada jumped from 13 per cent in the 1980s to 57 per cent today, in part thanks to the programme. In the UK, this rate stands at 34 per cent. The programme was also associated with a nine per cent reduction in hospital admissions for stroke, heart attack and heart failure among people aged under 65, compared to communities that did not implement the tests. In September, the British Heart Foundation announced £1.5m of funding for pop-up blood pressure check points in public places to pioneer the community-based approach. They now hope it will eventually be adopted at a national level. read more