21 12 19

first_imgEureka >> The postseason is a daunting time for all sports as the fate of any team, regardless of record, talent or determination, is anything but predictable. Fate unfortunately was not with the St. Bernard’s girls soccer team as it lost a lead en route to dropping the quarterfinal round of the North Coast Section Division III playoffs, 2-1, to Middletown on Saturday at Crusader Field.For the Lake County residents, Mustangs head coach Lamont Kucer said the four hour drive to Eureka is too …last_img

16 12 19

first_imgWhat gets to define “passive house”?In their accompanying comments, most of the signatories seem to have no problem with PHIUS’s plan to modify criteria for the colder parts of North America, though they agree with Robinson’s contention that, should PHIUS modify its criteria, marketing the revised standard as “Passive House” would create confusion.“ ‘Passive House’ is not a trademark or brand, but it does have a recognized meaning internationally and in the U.S.,” wrote Greg Duncan, an architect and certified Passivhaus designer based in Brooklyn, New York. “I believe that if PHIUS starts certifying buildings that do not meet this standard, they should use a different term.” UPDATED 4/5/2012 with new blog linksProduct names, program names, brands, and logos can be potent symbols of identity, so much so they’re often at the center of all kinds of marketing initiatives, corporate litigation, and cultural iconography. For people in the building industry, the term “passive house” – or Passivhaus, as we call it here – has come to mean a specific performance standard, and some say that if the criteria behind the standard are loosened to accommodate, say, climate conditions, a name other than Passive House (or Passivhaus) should be used.That is the core idea of a petition that has been circulating on the Web since March 16 via SignOn, a petitioning tool sponsored by civic action group MoveOn.org. Hayden Robinson, an architect and certified Passivhaus consultant based in Seattle, launched the petition to suggest to Passive House Institute U.S. – which has been examining data from 100 PHIUS-certified projects and fielding comments from the building community about possibly relaxing the Passivhaus standard for some projects in extremely cold climates – that the group’s initiative, while worthy, should proceed with a name other than Passive House. Several of those who signed the petition are in Western Europe, a few are in the U.K. and Canada, and at least one is in Australia. Multiple standards would create confusionHere’s the text of the petition: “The Passive House building energy standard is widely recognized in North America and internationally. In the United States, the standard is used by hundreds of businesses and professionals, and its criteria are maintained by a number of certifying agencies offering services across the country. In its blog post, ’15kWh is dead. Long live 15kWh,’ PHIUS publicized a plan to create its own certification criteria and promote them using the Passive House name. PHIUS’s desire to innovate is commendable, and the larger conversation around potential improvements to the Passive House standard is healthy; however, having multiple standards competing under the name Passive House would create confusion and controversy. We therefore ask PHIUS to distinguish its program by giving it a distinctive name.” RELATED ARTICLES Redefining Passivhaus The Passivhaus Institut in Germany Disowns Its U.S. Satellite The American Passive House Institute Responds to Dr. FeistRound 3: Wolfgang Feist Discusses the PHI-PHIUS SplitPassivhaus Combatants Continue To Speak OutPossible Relaxation of Passivhaus Standard Stirs Debate PHIUS Tries to Trademark ‘Certified Passive House Consultant’PHIUS Draws a Line in the SandA Bridge Over Passivhaus Waterscenter_img Katrin Klingenberg respondsPHIUS director Katrin Klingenberg told GBA she regards the petition as a “pretty normal response to our proposal for change” – a response, she said, that stems in part from misunderstandings about PHIUS’s study of building science and building performance as it relates to climate zones in North America.“We haven’t been doing our best to communicate what we’re doing more clearly,” she said, noting in an e-mail that PHIUS’s data analysis “will address climates that are very different from the central European climate. Some climates might see a slight relaxation in the annual energy target (Duluth, MN, very cold), some will see a tightening (San Francisco, CA, much milder). It only makes sense to not make Passive House cost-prohibitive/impossible in very cold climates.”Klingenberg also wrote, “Modifications will be in line with critiques of Passive House from leading building scientists and energy experts in North America like John Straube, Marc [Rosenbaum], Martin [Holladay], etc.”Klingenberg pointed out that in dry, sunny climates of the sort found in New Mexico, hitting the annual energy target could lean less on superinsulation and more on the output of a solar thermal system.“Modification doesn’t change the core value of PH,” she wrote, “it only makes it more accessible and cost-effective, and enhances its chance to become mainstream (without compromising comfort and envelope). It makes it the best it can be.” Discussion heats up in the blogosphereSeveral bloggers have chimed in on this dispute, including:Mike Eliason of Brute Force Collaborative: On Peti- & Certifica- tionsLloyd Alter of Treehugger: A Plague On Both Their Passive HousesAndrew Michler of Inhabitat: Passive House Debate Heats Up Mike Eliason again: Monitoring the Petition FalloutMatt Hickman of Mother Nature Network: Active AggressiveRoger at the EdgewaterHaus blog: When is a Passive House NOT a Passive House?last_img read more

15 12 19

first_imgWhy IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfaces Tags:#fitness tracker#Internet of Things#IoT#pollution#WHO Internet of Things Makes it Easier to Steal You… Small Business Cybersecurity Threats and How to… Amanda Razanicenter_img A recent study of air pollution in larger cities has produced some startling results.  Exercise is supposed to improve one’s health, but the evidence is showing it could actually be harmful in some areas.An international team of scientists studied the health benefits of cycling and walking against the negative toll of air pollution. They documented air quality through average annual levels of PM2.5s and arrived at a tipping point – the amount of time after which exercising actually turns harmful to the health, due to breathing in fine particulates. In many large cities, including Delhi in India and Zabol in Iran, a mere 30 minutes of cycling can begin to damage one’s health.See also: How to make air pollution measurement more accurate“If you are beyond the break-even point, you may be doing yourself more harm than good,” explained Audrey de Nazelle, a lecturer at Imperial College’s Centre for Environmental Policy, and an author of the research project.Air pollution located in big cities is getting worse. According to the World Health Organization, over 80% of citizens living in urban areas that track air pollution levels are exposed to air quality levels that exceed the WHO limit of 10μg/m3. Those most at risk live in cities with lower-income levels.The medical conditions of people with asthma and emphysema are exacerbated by air pollution exposure.  Respiratory disease, lung cancer, heart disease, and even damage to the brain, nerves, liver, or kidneys can be some of the long-term health issues caused by exposure to polluted air.The countries with the most cities that have the worst air pollution include Iran, India, Saudi Arabia and China.  The research found that western cities like New York, Los Angeles, Paris and London did not have air that was polluted enough to outweigh the positive effects of exercise.But don’t give up on exercise“The benefits of active travel outweighed the harm from air pollution in all but the most extreme air pollution concentrations,” added Nazelle.“While this research demonstrates the benefits of physical activity in spite of air quality, it is not an argument for inaction in combating pollution,” said Dr James Woodcock from the Centre for Diet and Activity Research.The issue of air pollution has become of interest to several companies who have produced environmental monitors like the upcoming Flow Air Quality Monitor.  It is a small device that can be easily carried wherever one goes to monitor air quality in the area.  Perhaps soon, we will have fitness trackers that offer this ability as well, so that excercise will not be impaired. Follow the Puck Related Posts last_img read more

12 12 19

first_imgBy Bari Sobelson, MS, LMFTFlickr [American by Kevin Cortopassi, August 15, 2015, CC BY-ND 2.0]Before I had much interaction with military service members and their families on a personal level and as a clinician, I always imagined homecoming as a most magical time. I couldn’t help but get wrapped up in the happily-ever-afters and the glamour of it all. But after having true interactions and conversations, I quickly realized that those images I had created in my head were simply not real.Yes, it’s a wonderful thing for families to be reunited from deployments. It’s thrilling, exciting, and heartwarming! But, it can also be stressful, frustrating, confusing, and heartbreaking. I have noticed two common themes in my conversations and limited research on homecomings: The person that left for deployment is not the same person that returns and neither are the families left behind. And, it is extremely difficult getting back in to a routine after deployments.Our service members are being sent to places they have never been to fight for our country and for people they have never even met. They are seeing things, hearing things, and feeling things that they never imagined in even their wildest dreams. They experience the unspeakable. They lose friends, they lose parts of their body. They see children die. They are on high alert at all times. They come in contact with people who appear to have no souls.The spouses and family members are left stateside to care for the children and tend to the homes. The bills still have to be paid, the children still have homework and ball practice, and there are still flat tires, medical emergencies, and really bad days. Jobs still want their employees to show up and schools expect children to be on time. Adjustments have to be made for new routines without their spouse.And then, the service members return home. Sure, the first few days are blissful; filled with welcome home signs, hugs, kisses, barbecues and celebrations. But then, reality hits. It’s time to get back to life; the bills are still there, obligations to jobs and families remain.How are our service members and their families supposed to slip right back in to life as it was before deployment? And, is it even possible to do that? We are all shaped by the experiences we have in our lives. While service members are shaped by the sights, sounds, and feelings they have had overseas, so too are the family members who have been at home trying to maintain their normalcy and create routines and structure.I asked two friends to share their experiences of transitioning back from deployment and here is what they told me:“It is always exciting when you begin the countdown to your spouse returning home from deployment and then that final day is finally here. But when you have kids involved in the countdown, you always do a type of countdown where you can add a few days without them really knowing a difference.  The return date usually changes. There is a feeling of joy and love that your family is finally complete again after so many months apart.  It can also be a frustrating time, as you have to learn one another again and get into a new routine…especially when you have kiddos involved.  Deployment is hard!  After so many months apart, things just don’t go back to the way they were before my spouse left.  Everyone has grown, physically and emotionally, especially the kids.  After many deployments, my husband still hears, “we don’t do it like that anymore daddy”.  Something I have learned about life after deployment is that it takes time.  Nothing is “normal” and we all have to learn each other and how to live with each other again.  Communication is always key.”“Life after deployment can be challenging because as the mothers who stay back and hold down the fort, so to speak, and take on both duties of mom and dad, we learn to get into our own routine. When dads return, it can often feel like they are getting in the way and messing up the flow of what we have been doing for so long. It’s basically a control thing for us women, I found out. Also, we establish these friendships that we like to call “sister wives” where we help each other out by cooking for each other, cleaning, watching each other’s kids, etc… so when the spouse returns, that is also something that is difficult to balance because we want to have these friendships and relationships stay strong for the next time we face deployment, but then our husband’s want our undivided attention since they have been away from us for so long. It’s a balancing act that we have to work on when they return home and realize that we are going to screw up, have frustrations and step on each other’s toes. But we need to communicate these feelings in the moment and not let them fester. It took some time to figure this out, but once we prepared for those challenges before he stepped off the plane, the easier it was.”Are we doing enough to help our military families to transition back to their lives after deployment? Do we have enough resources for them? I think we need to be talking about how we can help protect those who sacrifice so very much to protect us. It’s certainly a conversation worth having.A special thank you to Erin Schnoes and Tara Brown for sharing their experiences as Air Force spouses.This post was written by Bari Sobelson, MS, LMFT, the social media and webinar coordination specialist for the MFLN Family Development Team. The Family Development team aims to support the development of professionals working with military families.  Find out more about the Military Families Learning Network Family Development team on our website, Facebook, and Twitter.last_img read more

19 11 19

first_imgTennis star Leander Paes’ long-pending matrimonial dispute with wife Rhea Pillai failed to reach an out-of-court settlement, after which the Supreme Court on Monday expressed readiness to adjudicate it.Both sides had prepared terms of agreement regarding a house, payment of maintenance and custody of the child but they could not achieve a common ground despite six sittings.Counsel for Pillai told the bench that she had asked Paes for a house but he was not agreeable to it. Both Paes and Pillai were present in the courtroom.PAES’ ARGUMENTSPaes’ lawyer said Pillai had already got a house from Bollywood actor Sanjay Dutt (her former husband) and the tennis star was not ready for another such demand. “He (Paes) is not agreeable to anything. Niether does he want to give anything, nor does he want to pay money”, Pillai’s counsel said. To this, the bench said it cannot force the parties for settlement and the matter would now be heard on merit.”If both sides are not ready to settle it amongst themselves, then we have to consider many things. The problem is that we cannot force a settlement. It has to be voluntary. Let the matter now go before a new bench as we had been pushing for mediation and propriety demands new judges hear the matter”, a bench of justices Arun Mishra and Amitav Roy said.’RESOLVE ISSUE AMICABLY’On January 18 also the court had asked the couple who have been fighting a legal battle for three years over their matrimonial dispute to resolve the issue amicably and try for an out-of-court settlement and sent them for mediation.advertisement”Show sporting spirit in real life too”, the bench had told the couple during the last date of hearing.The pair is locked in a legal battle over maintenance and custody of their 11-year-old daughter since 2014, when Pillai had filed a case of domestic violence and harassment against Leander Paes and his father in a magistrate’s court in Mumbai.She had sought maintenance, but her plea was opposed by Paes who claimed that he was not married to Rhea and hence, she was not his wife.Also Read:Leander Paes and Ramkumar Ramanathan in finals of Tallahassee ChallengerMahesh Bhupathi-Leander Paes war gets uglier after India Today reveals text messagesAlso Watch:Never communicated to Leander Paes he was in the scheme of things for Davis Cup: Mahesh Bhupathi to India Todaylast_img read more

17 09 19

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Bahamas Police denies suspect hide out in TCI Recommended for you Related Items:colin heatwell, national insurance board, NIB, premier rufus ewing, strike, washington misick Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppProvidenciales, 31 Oct 2014 – Strike action at the National Insurance Board office in Providenciales is prompted by slow payment to staff on a salary increase, approved weeks ago. Those are the reports reaching our news room as customers wondered why the Provo office was closed to business today. Photos to MM show the Premier peering through the door, trying to see for himself why customers were locked out… with a note at the Hilly Ewing building site saying there would be no penalty of late fees; that the office would reopen on Monday. The CEO of the NIB, Colin Heartwell said it was an unusual predicament and blamed it on lack of capacity. To us, it was shared that cashiers are among those tired of waiting on salary increase monies to be paid to them… one informant citing that upper management has gotten their money and the fact that other staff has to wait is unfair. The Premier was allowed into the office, returned with comments for the media which said there are issues, that he will be working with the board to iron out those issues but no details on what the issues were… Heartwell confirmed that only the Provo staff staged the sick out and apologized for the inconvenience. Minister Washington Misick, who holds the NIB in his ministerial portfolio said: I have been advised and assured that the matter is being looked into and the board will have a meeting on Monday in light of the action today.” Bench warrants issued for TCI insurance defaulters Bahamas NIB Manager remanded, charged with extortionlast_img read more

17 09 19

first_imgHundreds attended the 119th Memorial Day ceremony at Fort Rosecrans May 27, 2019 Allie Wagner Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitter Allie Wagner, Hundreds in attendance this morning for the 119th Memorial Day Ceremony at Fort Rosecrans to honor our fallen soldiers @KUSINews @KUSI_GMSD pic.twitter.com/MiLf9Z0e5P— Allie Wagner (@alliewagnertv) May 27, 2019 Remembering those who gave the ultimate sacrifice. They have set up a memorial called Arlington West in front of the @USSMidwayMuseum with 288 markers to honor those who have died. @KUSINews @KUSI_GMSD #memorialday pic.twitter.com/UPpmnPWvkt— Allie Wagner (@alliewagnertv) May 27, 2019 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN DIEGO (KUSI) – It is one of San Diego’s largest and most celebrated memorials dedicated to America’s veterans and today Fort Rosecrans National Cemetery hosted its annual Memorial Day celebration.The celebration is hosted by war veterans organizations, their auxiliaries, and patriotic groups.They’ve conducted the Memorial Day services at Fort Rosecrans National Cemetery om San Diego for over 100 years.KUSI’s Allie Wagner has more on this story. Posted: May 27, 2019last_img read more

3 09 19

first_imgUS president Donald Trump attends the Congressional Picnic on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, DC, on 21 June 2019. Photo: AFPAn advice columnist for Elle fashion magazine said Friday that Donald Trump sexually assaulted her in the dressing room of a New York department store more than two decades ago, an accusation swiftly denied by the US president.According to E. Jean Carroll, the rape occurred in either 1995 or 1996, when Trump was a prominent real estate developer and she was a well-known magazine writer and host of a television show.The account, revealed in an excerpt of Carroll’s latest book and published Friday by New York magazine, makes her at least the 16th woman to have accused Trump of sexual misconduct before he became president.Trump reacted with a statement saying he’d never met Carroll, and that the incident “never happened.”Carroll, 75, says she ran into Trump at the Bergdorf Goodman department store in Manhattan while they were both shopping.She says that in an initially friendly encounter, Trump asked her for advice on buying a piece of lingerie for an unnamed woman. Then jokingly, they each suggested that the other should try it on.”The moment the dressing-room door is closed, he lunges at me, pushes me against the wall, hitting my head quite badly, and puts his mouth against my lips,” Carroll wrote.Pinning her against the wall, Carroll says, Trump proceeded to pull down her tights, unzip his pants and penetrate her — all while himself fully dressed — until she finally managed to push him out and run from the dressing room.Carroll never went to the police because, she said, she was afraid of repercussions.Carroll wrote that she did not come forward sooner because she was afraid of “receiving death threats, being driven from my home, being dismissed, being dragged through the mud.””Joining the 15 women who’ve come forward with credible stories about how the man grabbed, badgered, belittled, mauled, molested and assaulted them, only to see the man turn it around, deny, threaten, and attack them, never sounded like much fun,” she wrote.Trump shot back that Carroll was an attention seeker.”I’ve never met this person in my life. She is trying to sell a new book –that should indicate her motivation,” he said in a statement. “It should be sold in the fiction section.”He also said that New York magazine is a “dying publication” and had tried to “prop itself up by peddling fake news.”The magazine quoted a senior White House official saying that the accusation “was created simply to make the president look bad,” while Trump asked if Carroll had links to his opponents in the Democratic party.last_img read more

30 08 19

first_img This hands-on workshop will give you the tools to authentically connect with an increasingly skeptical online audience. Your Branch OfficeSo, how do you go about finding your nearest co-working space? Check out http://coworking.pbworks.com/CoworkingVisaor search Google using your city name and the word “co-working.”And if business takes you on the road, there are dozens of work spaces in the U.S. and abroad that have open-door policies for co-workers from out of town. as part of a loosely structured “visa” program. This means you don’t have to hole up in a hotel room to conduct business or you can rub shoulders with co-workers in other cities, Co-working spaces in at least 17 states and 13 countries have signed on to participate in the program, which invites co-workers to drop in and work at little or no cost.”If you’re a member of a co-working space, come on in, take a seat and work here as many days as you like,” says Susan Evans, co-founder of Office Nomads in Seattle. Terms, such as whether to call or e-mail ahead to confirm space availability, vary by organization. For an updated list of visa-friendly spaces and their requirements, check http://coworking.pbworks.com/CoworkingVisa. This story appears in the October 2009 issue of Entrepreneur. Subscribe » Free Workshop | August 28: Get Better Engagement and Build Trust With Customers Now Headed to New York City? Airbnb lists a fully equipped studio apartment with a view of the Empire State Building for $169 a night. Traveling to Paris? There’s an airy apartment in Le Marais for $140 a night. There are also cheaper, and less cushy, options: nightly rentals of spare bedrooms, sofa beds, futons and–yes–air mattresses, for less than $100 a night, in more than 1,000 cities worldwide. 8 min read David Brunelle was living the dream: He’d shucked his 9-to-5 office job, liberated himself from the cubicle farm and started his own business. He was working from home, being his own boss . and before long, wallowing in freedom.”More often than not, I’d find myself on the couch, playing Xbox at 1 in the afternoon,” says Brunelle, a Seattle web developer. “It became pretty clear that to be productive, I needed structure, I needed to set boundaries between my work and my home life, and I needed to be around other people who are serious about their work.”center_img September 17, 2009 Co-Working With Benefits Here’s an unexpected perk of the co-working movement: A co-working website that offers overnight accommodations in some of the world’s great cities, for the fraction of the price of a hotel room. Airbnb was launched in 2008 after three San Francisco entrepreneurs recognized the need for lodging in the city. Roommates Joe Gebbia and Brian Chesky decided to offer up their place, along with some breakfast and local hospitality, to a few friendly strangers attending a conference. It was a success, and with help from their tech-savvy friend Nathan Blecharczyk, the three launched a website, found a few guests and Airbnb was born. The fully automated site handles secure online credit card transactions, and includes rich user profiles and user reviews. -Kara Ohngren Enroll Now for Free Fortunately, Brunelle, who launched his web design company last November, discovered Office Nomads, a 5,000-square-foot collection of work spaces designed for people just like him: sole proprietors, freelancers, artists, consultants and other independent workers who have emerged to work and connect under the same roof.Their search for a workplace that combines the best of a home office, an internet cafe and a traditional office has given rise to a whole new movement, with an awkward but apt name: “co-working.” It’s a dramatic U-turn in the quest for the perfect work environment–a migration back to the cubicle from the often-idealized home office, but a cubicle reimagined for a time when the line between domestic and professional life has never been more blurred.Co-working spaces–which cost anywhere from $25 a day for occasional drop-ins to $500 or more a month–only began popping up a few years ago in places like New York and San Francisco. Now they are slowly becoming a national and international phenomenon. The potential is huge: More than 10 million Americans are self-employed, up from about 8 million in 1980. Freelance job sites are booming, too: Elance.com had postings jump 40 percent in the first half of this year, while Guru.com saw its total membership grow by 15% over the year before.The appeal of co-working seems clear: It provides people like Brunelle a professional and social package that most alternatives can’t match. For starters, there’s the real-live-human camaraderie you can’t get from Facebook or text messaging, as well as the potential for networking and uncovering new business opportunities. A co-working office can also offer a sounding board for ideas in an informal setting. And it relieves, for the most part, the energy-sapping world of office politics–not to mention blood-draining commutes.All that, plus a basic support system that typically includes dedicated spaces for working and for socializing, high-speed internet, a kitchenette and, naturally, some type of caffeine-dispensing appliance. Printers and fax machines could also be available. Some spaces sweeten the package with lockers, showers and yoga classes. Others offer audio-video equipment, organized social outings, consulting services–and one of the newest services: child care.Capitalizing on the fact that co-workers may have small children in need of supervision, Cubes&Crayons in Northern California has added onsite child care at its locations in San Francisco and Mountain View. What the company calls “professional, developmentally appropriate” care for children between the ages of 3 months and 5 years is provided during regular business hours. There’s flexibility in choosing a plan–full-time, part-time or drop-in. Rates for members range from $17 an hour for occasional drop-ins to a flat fee of $600 per month for 60 hours of care. Cubes&Crayons may be the first, but it is unlikely to be the last, to start grooming the next generation of co-workers.But for most people, what makes co-working alluring isn’t the child care or the yoga but the cooperative spirit and community vibe fostered by the people who populate those spaces.Take Tony Bacigalupo. “I was working from home for a web consulting firm and realized I needed to be around other people and out of the house,” he explains. “The local café wasn’t great as a work environment either. Then I discovered there was already a burgeoning movement for people like me.”Similar disenchantment with working from home prompted Andrew Luter, a private equity investor in Denver, and Susan Evans, an environmental consultant in Seattle, to turn to co-working at around the same time.”Isolation,” Evans says, “is an inconvenient byproduct of the concept of home-office convenience.” For Luter, the problem with working from home “wasn’t just the distractions, it was the sense of physical and mental separation.”Having met enough like-minded people to believe co-working was more than a passing fancy, Bacigalupo, Evans and Luter were soon investing in the business and helping propel the movement in their respective cities. In April 2007, Luter opened the Hive in Denver. Seven months later, Office Nomads, the brainchild of Evans and business partner Jacob Sayles, began welcoming members in the Capitol Hill neighborhood of Seattle. And a year after that, Bacigalupo opened New Work City in Manhattan’s SoHo neighborhood. Meanwhile, co-working spaces also were debuting across the country–and not just in the largest cities but in smaller urban areas and university towns with thriving populations of entrepreneurs and independent workers.Now, less than a year after opening, New Work City hosts anywhere from 40 to 50 full- and part-time members on a given day. To be there, they can pay a $25 daily drop-in fee or $500 a month for a full-time membership, which affords them 24/7 access to the space. The Hive, meanwhile, has roughly 20 members who use its 4,000-square-foot space, paying $199 per month for 24/7 access. Brunelle is one of about 25 full-time members at Office Nomads; for $475 they get “resident” status, which comes with a dedicated desk and 24/7 access. There are also part-timers and drop-ins.Graphic artists and business consultants, architects and publicists, authors and code-writers: As diverse and colorful as the co-working crowd is, there are unifying threads. “No one in here wants to work by themselves; everyone is here because they want to be here,” Evans says.And, Bacigalupo adds, co-workers tend to be personable types. “The jerks rarely stick around, if they come here in the first place, and they rarely do. These are offices spaces without all the sucky parts of an office.”He explains that people spent most of the 20th century figuring out how to go from blue-collar to white-collar jobs. “Now we’re looking for a new kind of personal workplace beyond the white-collar environment,” he says. “I think what we’re seeing now is a resurgence of interest in the possibilities of the virtual office–a healthier, more sustainable version of telecommuting.”The variety of people working in complementary fields can make co-working spaces fertile ground for new business opportunities, too. “There’s certainly work being passed to and fro among members,” Evans says. “That is definitely a consistent theme across co-working spaces. It’s a huge benefit.”In the end, it is camaraderie, community and connectedness that fuel this trend. “It is what members make it,” Evans says, “and they have made it pretty awesome.”So awesome, in fact, that Brunelle says he has “no complaints and no regrets” after six months as an Office Nomads full-timer–even though it’s meant sacrificing those pajamas-and-Xbox afternoons. last_img read more

19 08 19

first_img Michael Smith Friday, June 9, 2017 Share TravelBound promotes its best sellers and agent incentive in new video series Posted bycenter_img TORONTO — TravelBound’s Business Development Manager Jennifer Bond is the star of Travelweek’s latest video series.TravelBound, the F.I.T. Specialist, is proudly 100% agent exclusive and is incentivizing bookings with its Amazon Rewards campaign. The incentive gives agents a chance to win Amazon gift cards for booking key destinations and products throughout the year. These include Iceland, USA, Canada 150 and Wave Season. Agents can go to gotravelbound.com to register and learn more.In the series’ Tips video, Bond details how the company’s support team is always available via phone to assist agents, but she also wants agents to know that TravelBound has invested heavily into its website to make bookings easier. The company has added plenty of comprehensive content to the site to ensure clients’ questions are answered quickly. She also encourages agents to follow TravelBound’s Facebook page t0 view updates: facebook.com/TravelBoundforTravelAgents.The last video in the series highlights the company’s top five selling destinations and the products it sells in each.More news:  Flight Centre Travel Group takes full ownership of Quebec-based agencyFor more information on TravelBound, go to gotravelbound.com.To see more videos from Travelweek, go to youtube.com/travelweek. Tags: Agent Incentives, Travelbound, Video << Previous PostNext Post >>last_img read more