21 12 19

first_imgThis week Rushe Fitness gym owner Emmet Rushe gives you three Christmas themed recipes that you can use over the holiday period. One is a starter, one is a main and the other is a side dish. They all have that festive theme and they all taste great.If you use them, be sure to let me know what you think of them. You can get these and more, FREE weekly recipes when you join our Lean 2.0 program that starts on January 6th. Spaces are filling up already, so if you want to get a head start on your January resolutions, click the link below and get on the waiting list now!CLICK HERE NOW!BLINIS WITH HUMMUS & SMOKED SALMONServes 4. WHAT YOU NEED:  1 cup (120g) buckwheat flour1 tsp. baking powder 1 tsp. salt1 egg, separated½ cup (125ml) of sparkling water1 tbsp. coconut oil, for frying½ cup (120g) hummus3.5 oz. (100g) smoked salmonblack pepper, to tastehandful parsley, dill or chives, to serveWHAT YOU NEED TO DO: Sieve the buckwheat flour, baking powder and salt into a bowl.Beat the egg yolk with almond milk and pour, stirring in the flour. Keep stirring until you have a smooth batter. Beat the egg whites until stiff. Carefully fold into the batter.Heat some oil in a frying pan. Spoon small mounds of batter into the pan and fry on both sides until golden brown on medium heat. Flip them when bubbles come to surface. Brush the blinis with hummus and divide the salmon on top. Grind some pepper and garnish with herbs.STIR-FRIED BRUSSELS SPROUTS WITH BACONServes 4WHAT YOU NEED: 7 cup (700g) brussels sprouts2 shallots1 tbsp. olive oil4.4 oz. (125g) smoked baconWHAT YOU NEED TO DO: Cut the bottom of the sprouts and remove the outer leaves. Boil them in water for about 8 min. Meanwhile, finely chop the shallots. Heat the oil in a pan and fry the bacon for 5 minutes.  Next add in the shallots and cook for another 2 min. Drain the brussels sprouts and add them into the pan, then stir-fry for about 2 min. Season with pepper and salt and serve.ROSEMARY ROAST TURKEY Ingredients: 2 Tbsp. Extra Virgin Olive Oil 2 Tbsp. fresh Rosemary, chopped 3kg. Turkey Breast 2 tsp. Sea Salt and Pepper, to tasteDirections:  Preheat oven to 325°F.  Brush olive oil over turkey breast.  Sprinkle rosemary over turkey breast. Season with salt and pepper.  Place turkey in roasting pan. Cook for approximately 25 minutes per pound (done when meat thermometer reaches 170°F).  Occasionally baste turkey with juices in the pan (especially near the end).  Let rest for 10 minutes. Enjoy!! There you have it. Three great recipes that you can use to add flavour to your Christmas meals. Our Rushe Fitness members get recipes like these, every 6-weeks in our Lean2.0 program. So, if you are ready to become the next version of yourself, click the link below to get signed up now. We start on January 6th. #lean2.0CLICK HERE TO JOIN THE WAITING LISTDD Fitness: Festive treats for you to eat was last modified: December 6th, 2019 by Emmet RusheShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:emmet rushefestive foodrushe fitnesslast_img read more

21 12 19

first_imgEmbed from Getty ImagesIt has been an eventful day at QPR, whose efforts to revamp their squad continue.West London Sport revealed this week that Rangers will listen to offers for Ariel Borysiuk after he failed to impress Ian Holloway.The Polish midfielder’s former club Lechia Gdańsk have since shown an interest in taking him back to his homeland on loan.Rangers manager Holloway has paid tribute to Karl Henry but revealed he would not have given him a new contract had he been in charge in the summer.That prompted Henry to confirm on Twitter that, as West London Sport revealed, he had recently fallen out with Holloway.Holloway has also made it clear that he would like to send youngsters Olamide Shodipo and Osman Kakay out on loan.Meanwhile, Tjaronn Chery’s move from QPR to Chinese club Guizhou Hengfeng Zhicheng has been confirmed.Rangers and Fulham have both been charged by the FA following the angry scenes during the final minutes of Saturday’s derby at Loftus Road. Fulham have agreed a deal to sign Werder Bremen midfielder Athanasios Petsos on loan.Embed from Getty ImagesBut the Whites’ promotion hopes suffered a setback when they were beaten 1-0 at Reading, where Chris Martin had a penalty saved for the second successive match.And West Ham look likely to finally complete the signing of Scott Hogan from Brentford following weeks of negotiations between the two clubs.   Ads by Revcontent Trending Articles Urologists: Men, Forget the Blue Pill! This “Destroys” ED x ‘Genius Pill’ Used By Rich Americans Now Available In Netherlands! x Men, You Don’t Need the Blue Pill if You Do This x What She Did to Lose Weight Stuns Doctors: Do This Daily Before Bed! x One Cup of This (Before Bed) Burns Belly Fat Like Crazy! x Drink This Before Bed, Watch Your Body Fat Melt Like Crazy x Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

12 12 19

first_imgThe close-up shot is a director’s secret weapon, but it requires technical know-how and narrative timing. Here’s what you need to know.Cover image via REDPIXEL.PL.There is a scene in Five Easy Pieces wherein Bobby Dupea (Jack Nicholson) wheels his ailing father (William Challee) outside in the cold to view the sunset, confess, expose, and apologize for his estrangement from the family. It’s a powerful sequence and a raw and emotional disclosure for our main character.The scene requires intimacy, and Bob Rafelson knew that it required a close-up — but one that served the story and the character. These men have had a turbulent, cold, and distant relationship. The sequence begins reflecting the past with a long shot of Nicholson and Challee against a dramatic sunset. They are both small and insignificant against the majestic sky.Image via Columbia Pictures.They stop dead center in the frame, and at this camera distance, Nicholson fixes the blanket on the old man’s lap and utters “You cold” to someone too sick for words. It’s the first step at connection, and on action, as Nicholson bends down to his level, Rafelson cuts to a medium two-shot. He sustains this shot for about 40 seconds, until Nicholson earns his close up — until the character is ready to reveal something. And even then, Rafelson frames the shot below his shoulders to not be too intrusive. He allows his actor to determine the frame.Rafelson doesn’t rein in the performance — if Nicholson needed to drop his head, the camera moved with him. When Nicholson leans and nearly leaves the frame, Rafelson cuts quickly to a reaction shot of Challee then returns to Nicholson swinging back in. It’s at that exact moment when Nicholson loses it emotionally, and he becomes his most vulnerable. All of this is by design, not luck or spontaneity. The people in the editing room chose these moments precisely to reflect the director’s vision for the emotional result of the scene.The PayoffImage via Paramount.Just like the source material, the close-up (by design) is the payoff shot. A line like “Frankly, my dear, I don’t give a damn” in Gone With the Wind only has power because of the nearly four hours we’ve spent watching Rhett Butler pursue, sacrifice for, and ache over Scarlett O’Hara. When he says that line, it’s a release for the character and the end of his story.The same principle applies to shooting. The close-up shot is a window into the character. It can reveal the character’s growth moment (John McClane’s confession to Powell that he never told his wife he’s sorry in Die Hard); it can depict a character discovering something important (Gene Hackman unraveling the truth in The Conversation) or create tension between characters (the standoff in The Good, the Bad and the Ugly). It can be all this and much more. It is a tool the director uses to let the audience know that a particular moment is important.If you overuse it, you run the risk of fatiguing the viewer and undermining the truly important moments. If you avoid it completely, you may be missing opportunities to reveal character and risk emotionally alienating the story.Technical ConsiderationsImage via United Artists.You’ll want to use a longer lens (70mm-100mm) for a close-up. A longer lens makes the depth of field shallower and throws the background out of focus. A wider lens tends to distort faces, making them look abnormal. Longer lenses reduce that effect. If you were to use a 24mm lens, you would have to move the camera very close to your subject to frame the actor for a close-up and  contend with a lot more background than you would using a 70 or 85mm lens.In terms of storytelling, overusing the close-up might undermine the artistic vision. If you highlight every scene as special, then nothing is particularly special. In addition, overusing the close-up can disorient the viewer. If there are no establishing shots or master or medium shots that show the viewer where they are in the context of the events in the film, you can create a frustrating experience that won’t serve the story.Continuity is also an important consideration. You may be so focused on the depth of field that subtle aspects of continuity could get lost. For example, if you were shooting outside, was there a breeze in the establishing or wide shot that later, when you are shooting the close-up, is missing? Has the natural light dramatically changed, and will you need to artificially match it to the master? The temperature? If so, pay attention so the actor doesn’t appear cold in the master but comfortable in the close-up.Up Close and PersonalImage via Artisan Entertainment.The close-up is a powerful design tool for the director. It should spring from the screenplay, giving the viewer clues and insight into story and character.Try to imagine Ellen Burstyn’s powerful story about wearing the red dress in Requiem for a Dream from across the room. And see what the director (Aronofsky) conveys by getting out of the close-up as soon as Jared Leto’s character begins to lie. He stands, moves away, and ends up framed at the very edge. He is so far removed from the previous intimacy that he is practically out of frame. That is filmmaking that serves the story and resonates with the audience.Looking for more cinematography breakdowns? Check out these articles.ESCAPE ROOM (Short Film) — How To Composite Your Own StuntsFilmmaking Lessons from Oscar-Nominated DirectorsOn Fading to Black: The Hows, The Whens, and The WhysThe Cameras and Lenses Behind 2018 Oscar-Nominated FilmsBezier Curves: What Are They and How Do You Use Them?last_img read more

1 12 19

first_imgA day after the CBI issued summons to former Kolkata Police Commissioner Rajeev Kumar to appear before the agency, the senior IPS officer on Saturday failed to turn up at its headquarters in the city. The Calcutta High Court had on Friday vacated the interim order providing him protection from arrest by the CBI in the Saradha scam, following which he was issued summons by the Central agency. A team of CBI officers met their counsel Y J Dastoor, who had represented the agency in the High Court, and discussed their options for more than a hour. “We are discussing the matter with our lawyers,” CBI Joint Director Pankaj Srivastava told journalists. Asked what action would the agency taker against Mr. Kumar, “We cannot disclose that,” he said.Mr. Kumar, who is posted as Additional Director General, CID, remained untraced in the day. The CBI served notice on him under Section 160 of The Code of Criminal Procedure in the multi-crore scam. Mr. Kumar was part of the Special Investigation Team ( SIT) set up by the West Bengal government to probe the case before the agency took it up in 2014. In February, Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee sat in dharna when the CBI tried to question the former Kolkata Police Commissioner.last_img read more