11 01 20

first_imgThe Fort St. John page will be live as of tonight. The actual “opening of the chapter” happens at around 6:00 pm. When asked if police ever get involved, Snydmiller says that he has tried but they haven’t really done anything to assist.“I’ve tried, but they haven’t really done anything for me. So I just stopped. I had a really, really bad case where we had a guy talking to multiple decoys all over Canada and he was saying some really gross things, and being almost violent towards the decoy. So, 3 weeks before he was supposed to come to Grande Prairie, I brought all these chat logs and everything to the police and I said ‘hey, I won’t even do the video if you guys bust this guy, I’ll let you guys deal with it’.3 weeks later, I didn’t get a phone call. The guy showed up to town, and we busted him.”Snydmiller says the man actually admitted to another crime, and ended up turning himself into police after they busted him.Advertisement FORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – Dallas Snydmiller, who is the president of Creep Catchers in Grande Prairie, says Creep Catchers will be going live in Fort St. John in the next 24 hours.The original Creep Catchers started in Calgary, by a man named Dawson Raymond around a year ago. Snydmiller says that people were getting sick of hearing the stories about how people would be busted and then basically let go. He says nobody was facing charges so Raymond started up the Calgary chapter and it exploded from there.Snydmiller started the Grande Prairie organization. He says he’s been doing recruiting. He also used to work in Fort St. John himself.“I used to work in that area of BC a lot in the oil fields in Fort St. John, Dawson Creek, Chetwynd area. There’s a lot of traffic around there, so I looked to one of the guys on my team who works up there fairly often and I said ‘hey, I’d like you to start fishing up there and see if you can catch some guys and lets start helping out Fort St. John area and Dawson Creek too’.”- Advertisement -For those who aren’t familiar with how the Creep Catchers operate, they set up decoy accounts that look like younger girls. Snydmiller says that they don’t message anybody first, they wait for people to message them.“It is a lot like fishing. You throw out your bait, and wait. In this case, we’ll get messages. From there, we start talking to them. We tell them that we’re 13, 14, or 15 and in some cases, I’ve seen as low as 11. At that point, they can either stop talking to the decoy or they can keep talking to the decoy. When they continue talking to the decoy, the guys usually ask for a meet and then will go and meet them and from there they end up on Facebook or YouTube or whatever social media platform you see them on.”Advertisementlast_img read more

3 12 19

first_imgIn a 226 to 179 vote, the House adopted a proposal from Representative Mark Meadows (R–NC) to bar the United States from entering international trade agreements to cut climate-warming greenhouse gas emissions. An amendment from Representative Scott Perry (R–PA), adopted on a voice vote, would bar spending money on a number of government climate assessments and reports, including the U.S. Global Change Research Program’s National Climate Assessment (NCA). The president has used the most recent NCA, released last month, to bolster his Climate Action Plan to cut U.S. greenhouse gas emissions.Several other amendments offered by Democrats to bolster funding for ocean acidification and climate research failed on voice votes.Advocates for strong action on climate change are hoping the Senate will hold firm against the climate-related funding restrictions and strip out the “poison pills,” says Michael Halpern of the Union of Concerned Scientists in Cambridge, Massachusetts. The White House has also indicated its opposition to climate research limits.One ocean advocate, meanwhile, calls the House bill a “mixed bag. … We’re not thrilled but not devastated,” says Jeff Watters, acting director of government relations at the Ocean Conservancy in Washington, D.C. “It certainly doesn’t meet our expectation of what needs to happen.”Overall, the bill would keep top-line funding numbers for the Commerce Department’s National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) roughly equal to current spending. But it would cut NOAA’s climate-related research funding by $37.5 million, or 24%, from 2014. It also rejects a NOAA request to spend $15 million on a package of three space-based instruments including the Total Solar Irradiance Sensor, and a $9 million boost, to $15 million, for NOAA’s ocean acidification research and monitoring programs.In a report that accompanies the bill, the House also moved to block the White House’s controversial proposed closure of NOAA’s historic research lab near Beaufort, North Carolina. Some ocean and climate researchers are suffering a bit of heartburn from amendments that lawmakers in the U.S. House of Representatives last week added to a major spending bill.In a 321 to 87 vote, the Republican-controlled House on 30 May approved a $51 billion spending bill that would fund the departments of Commerce and Justice, and an array of other agencies including the National Science Foundation (NSF), in the 2015 fiscal year that begins 1 October. During 2 days of debate on the bill, House members offered scores of amendments, many proposing to shift funding between programs or cut spending. NSF survived the free-for-all largely unscathed.But lawmakers adopted several amendments that targeted marine research and climate science programs. The U.S. Senate, which this week begins work on its version of the spending bill, would have to agree to the amendments in order for them to become law (and in the past has stripped similar provisions from the legislation). 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The amendment, which is similar to past amendments adopted by the House but later stripped from final measures, was approved on a voice vote.last_img read more

2 12 19

first_imgRadical Sikh groups in other countries, engaged in secret talks with the government, put forward three main demands, including an apology at a global forum for the 1984 military operation in the Golden Temple and a special status for the Akal Takht and Harmandar Sahib on the lines of the Vatican, according to two people familiar with the developments.One of them, who was familiar with the process to reach out to Sikh groups since its inception, said contact was initially established with UK-based Sikh groups through London-based interlocutor Jasdev Singh Rai, director of the Sikh Human Rights Forum, shortly before Prime Minister Narendra Modi visited London in November 2015 and formal talks began after Rai and some 30 Sikh leaders met Modi during the visit.Read it at Hindustan Times Related Itemslast_img read more