14 01 20

first_imgMr. Allison thanks the residents for their patience – Advertisement – The National Housing Authority (NHA) has purchased 12.5 acres at the cost of US$40,000 in D. Wiles Town near VOA to begin the construction of 54 duplexes (108 units) for erosion victims from West Point.Residents for their patience, promising that the project will begin in about two weeks.Addressing a group of West Point residents displaced by erosion in the township, NHA deputy managing director for technical services yesterday assured them that the construction will begin in about two weeks.He said the project was initially intended to cover 25 acres, but that the government has so far been able to make only half of the money available to begin the construction of the housing units.“We thank you for your patience because the project involves planning and resources,” Allison said as the residents cheered him on. “After clearings and other works, we will begin the construction in about two weeks from today.”He said the cost of a housing unit is estimated at US$18,000 and commended President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf and the government for making the initial amount ready for the project.A unit will include two bedrooms, a kitchen, dining room, living room and a back porch. The construction work is divided among nine Liberian-owned construction companies, said Allison.Rev. Demore W. Moore, chairman of the Disaster Victims Assistance of West Point, commended the government for its initiative to build the homes.Speaking on behalf of the West Point Commissioner, Rev. Demore W. Moore recounted the suffering of many West Point residents, and the efforts to find temporary residences for them.He said over 200 residents are presently displaced because of the continuous erosion in the township. He appealed for blankets, buckets, mattresses, cooking utensils and other household items needed to ease the suffering of the victims.Mr. Stephen B. Scott, field supervisor from the Liberian Refugee Repatriation & Resettlement Commission (LRRRC), also commended  the residents for their patience and assured them of LRRRC’s support.In his remarks, Commissioner Soko D. Wiles of the Brewerville City Council spoke about the need for Liberians to support each other in times of crises. He said his family decided to sell the land to the government to provide homes for distressed citizens from West Point.District #17 representative aspirant Abraham C. Sessay, Chief Executive Officer of Red Power FM 100.3, thanked the people of the district for exercising patience while the government endeavors to make money available to start the project.He pledged his support to ensure that the distressed Liberians from West Point get relief. “We will do our best to work together to make your stay better,” he told the gathering.Meanwhile, the Disaster Victims Assistance (DVA) group is constructing three tents as temporary shelter for three family heads of eight persons per family, for a total of 24 persons that are expected to be resettled in the community.For more than a year, erosion has affected hundreds in the Township of West Point.  The NHA provided over 30 families temporary zinc houses in VOA near Brewerville.The construction on the original 25 acres will include 108 duplexes at an estimated cost of US$1.3m. The project is funded by the Liberian government to resettle hundreds of erosion victims from the township of West Point.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

21 12 19

first_imgLONDON — The Raiders keep finding innovative and embarrassing ways to lose this season, and their latest act was by far the worst yet.An utter humiliation at the hands of the mediocre Seattle Seahawks at Wembley Stadium on Sunday night sent the Raiders to 1-5, their 27-3 blowout defeat the latest page in a book that keeps getting worse and worse.With the Raiders entering the bye week before facing the 1-5 Indianapolis Colts at home, here is your Week 6 report card. Passing game: …last_img

17 12 19

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Jerry HagstromDTN Political CorrespondentWASHINGTON (DTN) — While Friday’s announcement from China that it would suspend additional tariffs on U.S. pork is a good sign, China should remove the 60% punitive tariff it has placed on U.S. pork to ease its own rising pork prices and move along trade talks with the United States, National Pork Producers Council officials said.If the Chinese government would do this, “It would help their citizens,” who are experiencing rising pork prices due to African swine fever, NPPC President David Herring, a Lillington, North Carolina producer, said at a briefing for reporters Thursday following an NPPC fly-in to Washington.Early Friday, China announced it will suspend “additional tariffs” on pork, soybeans and other farm goods, Xinhua News Agency reported. Yet it is unclear exactly what level of tariffs Chinese officials committed to suspend, and the Associated Press reported phone calls to Chinese government agencies were not answered Friday because of a national holiday.“If media reports are accurate, this is a most welcome development,” Herring said in a statement Friday.Tariffs on U.S. pork increased another 10% on Sept. 1, making the retaliatory tariff 60%, tacked on to a traditional 12% duty already in place. That puts the full Chinese tariff on U.S. pork now at 72%. The inability of U.S. producers to export to China is costing pork producers $8 per animal sold, according to Dermot Hayes, an economist at Iowa State University.With China forced to kill pigs to stop the spread of African swine fever and Chinese production down 50%, U.S. producers should benefit, but the tariffs make U.S. pork too expensive to import, said Nick Giordano, NPPC vice president and counsel for global government affairs.U.S. pork producers are benefiting from rising world pork prices due to lower Chinese production, but the benefits would be so much greater if the U.S. industry could export to China, he said.“Our sector is one of those most impacted by the trade disputes,” Giordano said.Removing the tariff on U.S. pork, “Would be viewed favorably by our industry but, more importantly, by the U.S. government,” Giordano said.Instead of exporting higher volumes in a period of Chinese shortages, American producers are watching their competitors in other countries make those sales, he added. Most U.S. competitors only pay a 12% duty selling into China.China bought 237,800 metric tons of U.S. pork and variety meats from January through July of this year, according to USDA data, a 51% increase from low 2018 sales to China. In terms of volume, China is the second-largest market behind Mexico. Japan remains the top market for U.S. pork in terms of dollar value, while China is third behind Mexico.Data published by the European Commission on the EU’s pork exports show that, during the first half of 2019, EU exports to China grew by 42% compared to the same period in 2019, going from 680,686 metric tons in 2018 to 965,768 metric tons in 2019, according to the swine industry website www.pig333.com.Asked whether the fact that the Chinese tariffs are in retaliation for U.S. tariffs means that President Donald Trump should reduce American tariffs to encourage the Chinese to reduce theirs, Giordano said, “We don’t always talk publicly about our discussions with the administration. The administration understands that this has taken quite a toll on the industry.”The trade aid package has been welcome but has not made up for producers’ losses, the officials said.Jen Sorenson, an Iowa producer who is a vice president of the council, said that the trade aid has been “positive” because people who have not been able to afford pork now have it.The officials also called for approval of the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement on trade, and Giordano said he believes Congress will vote on it.DTN Ag Policy Editor Chris Clayton contributed to this report.Jerry Hagstrom can be reached at jhagstrom@njdc.comFollow him on Twitter @hagstromreport(CC/AG)© Copyright 2019 DTN/The Progressive Farmer. All rights reserved.last_img read more

15 12 19

first_imgSince 2010 Apple has been suing everybody in sight for allegedly infringing on its intellectual property. Apple hasn’t just been suing its rivals but also portraying itself as a beacon of innovation and depicting its rivals as cloners and copycats — thieves, basically.So perhaps there is some satisfaction in seeing Apple get smacked for the very thing it keeps accusing others of doing.Yesterday a federal court in Dallas ruled that Apple must pay $368.2 million to a patent troll called VirnetX because its FaceTime videoconferencing software infringes on some patents owned by VirnetX.That’s pocket change to Apple, which posted $41.7 billion in net profit on $156.5 billion in revenues in the fiscal year that ended in September.But VirnetX wants more — it has filed a complaint with the International Trade Commission asking to have a bunch of Apple products (iPhone, iPad, Macs) banned from the market. Apple has no comment. But of course Apple will appeal, and of course the case will drag on.What Is The Point?And of course this is all lunacy. The real lesson to this and all of the other Apple-related cases is that the patent system is ridiculous and has become an obstacle to innovation, one whose ultimate victims are customers.In the tech world it’s considered depicable when trolls like VirnetX use patents to shake companies down for money.But is it any less despicable to cynically use the legal system to put a spoke in the wheel of your rivals? Or to use the legal system as a kind of marketing tool, a way to smear your opponents?Because that’s what Apple is doing with its cases against Samsung, HTC and Motorola. Apple doesn’t want to set up licensing agreements. Apple just wants to distract its opponents and slow them down. Marketing By LawsuitApple’s patent lawsuits are also a form of marketing, albeit an expensive one, whose goal is to generate lots of stories in the media and to hammer home, via repetition, the notion that everyone else in the smartphone market is simply copying Apple, producing me-too clones that are poor imitations of the iPhone and iPad.One court in England saw through the charade and resented the notion of being used as a propaganda tool by a large multinational corporation.Consequently the court ordered Apple to apologize publicly to Samsung for making false allegations and buy advertisements declaring that Samsung did not, in fact, copy Apple.Apple shamelessly and brazenly tried to turn that to its advantage, creating an “apology” that was really just another ad taunting Samsung. The annoyed judges ordered Apple to do the apology again, only this time to follow their instructions. The good news is that these lawsuits, all of them, are just speedbumps that will not stop the mobile revolution and probably won’t affect the balance of power in the smartphone market.Back in 2010, when Apple first launched its legal jihad against Android phone makers, Android had 23% market share and Apple had 15%. Today Apple still has the same 15% share — but Android now holds 75%.So much for the efficacy of lawsuits as competitive weapons. Someday, I hope, companies will figure out that these things don’t work. And someday the patent laws in this country will be updated for the 21st century. Fingers crossed.Image courtesy of Shutterstock. dan lyons Tags:#Apple#FaceTime#iPad#iPhone#legal#Mac#mobile#patent#patent troll#VirnetX A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic…center_img Related Posts Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Marketlast_img read more