New trustees join UVM board

Posted on January 1, 2021Categories sqfxhpcjTags , , , , , , , , , , ,   Leave a comment on New trustees join UVM board

first_imgUniversity of Vermont,The University of Vermont has announced that three new legislative trustees, a gubernatorial appointee, and a new student trustee are joining its board of trustees. The new legislative trustees, elected by the Vermont General Assembly to six-year terms, are Carolyn Branagan, Christopher Bray, and David Potter. Governor Douglas has appointed Mark Young, who previously served as a legislative trustee from 2002-2007, to a six-year term. The new student trustee, Adam Roof, was selected to serve a two-year term by the Associate Directors for the Appointment of The University of Vermont and State Agricultural College Student Trustees, Inc.Leaving the board are legislative trustees Edwin Amidon, James Leddy, and Martha Heath, gubernatorial appointed trustee Robert Young, and student trustee Beth Rice.All of the new trustees will participate in the board meeting scheduled for May 14 through 16.Branagan, a Republican from Georgia, has served in the Vermont House of Representatives since 2003. She was the House Education Committee clerk from 2003 to 2004 and is the House Ways and Means Committee ranking member in 2009/10. She is the Franklin County Republican Committee chair and is a member of the Governor’s Commission on International Education. She has also served as co-chair of the Vermont Legislative Women’s Caucus, chair of the Georgia School Board; member of the coordinating council of Vermont Interactive Television; and trustee and chair of the Vermont Maple Festival. She received B.S. and M.Ed. degrees from UVM.Bray, a Democrat from New Haven, has served in the Vermont House of Representatives since 2007. Formerly he taught at UVM for four years in the English department and founded Common Grounds Communications, which provides writing, editing, design and production services to a variety of clients and publishing houses. He is clerk of the House Agricultural Committee ; secretary of the Vermont Milk Commission; chair of the Rural Economic Development Working Group.; and member of the Vermont Forestry Commission and the Economic Development Committee of the Governor’s Dairy Task Force. He received a B.A degree from UVM in Zoology and an M.A. in English. He also graduated from UVM’s Snelling Center for Government.Potter, a Democrat from Clarendon, has served in the Vermont House of Representatives since 2005. Potter taught at Rutland High School for 31 years before retiring and was on active duty in the Air Force for 10 years. He is a member or affiliate of the West Rutland Rotary; the Rutland County Audubon Society; the Vermont Federation of Sportsman Clubs; the Rutland Regional Transportation Council; the Vermont Workforce Development Council; the Clarendon Selectboard; the Clarendon Planning Commission; the National Guard Association of the U.S.; the Vermont Sugarmakers Association; and the Vermont Woodland Association. In 2008 he was named Vermont Tree Farmer of the Year. He is a retired member of the Vermont Air National Guard, SQ Commander, Lt. Col.Young, of Orwell, is president and CEO of the First National Bank of Orwell. He currently serves as the Town of Orwell treasurer and trustee of Public Funds. He is a board member of Union Mutual of Vermont Companies and the Vermont Center for the Book and is a member of the Vermont Economic Progress Council. He was a member of the Vermont House of Representatives from 1993-2006. He is a past chair of the executive committee of the Vermont Bankers Association and received the Vermont Bankers Association Outstanding Community Service Banker Award in 2001.Roof, of South Walpole, Mass., is currently enrolled in the College of Arts and Sciences, majoring in Political Science and English. He serves on the Peer Judicial Board in the Harris/Millis residential complex, and is a member of the Dean of Students Advisory Board and the Men’s Club Hockey Team.last_img read more

Dornsife hosts values town hall

Posted on September 17, 2020Categories gkdecinrTags , , , , , , , , , , ,   Leave a comment on Dornsife hosts values town hall

first_imgCarol Faull, an external consultant, has been working with USC since August to evaluate the school’s current culture. (Long Le | Daily Trojan) More than 50 attendees learned about the experiences of the Dornsife community as reflected in the poll.  “I look toward the data that’s telling me what’s happening for communities that are marginalized,” Freeman said. “There’s opportunities to really understand [what] members within the gender categories are experiencing not only in their immediate environment but at USC as a whole.” Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences administrators emphasized Thursday the importance of the sessions the will hold to discuss needed changes to USC culture at the third of eight town hall.  Findings of personal values, current culture values and desired culture values by faculty, staff and students were discussed following the release of results from the USC Values Poll administered last Fall.  “It’s not that we have a list of 100 things to chase,” Faull said. “If we solely focused on those top five, we would have some really rich conversations and be able to shape the core unifying values that will take this university forward, as well as how we define that.”   “We heard in the past that for surveys that had been conducted … people never heard the results,” Faull said. “So we were committed through the working groups to transparency.” Discussion sessions to talk about the poll and its results will be held over the coming weeks with separate sessions for students, faculty and staff. The goal of the sessions is to collectively redefine the values of the University, according to Freeman. The poll was administered to find out what the USC community wanted to improve regarding the University’s culture. With approximately 20,000 participants across staff, faculty and students, the poll garnered a 27.4% participation rate. Specifically for Dornsife, there was a 24% participation rate. Freeman said releasing the poll’s results and gaining knowledge of community values was essential to Dornsife’s mission as a liberal arts college that centers its research around values. center_img According to the USC Values Poll, the University’s current cultural entropy, which represents the amount of energy consumed in unproductive work, is 28%. From this assessment, USC is categorized as facing “significant issues,” which means there are issues that require attention and systems that need exploration.  “We have world-class research in social sciences and natural sciences and humanities and so we create a lot of the content that eventually shows up in this kind of work around values,” Freeman said. “So I see an alignment with what we fundamentally do as a liberal arts college.” Faull said results showed that five of the top 10 values that were selected for desired culture, including communication, ethical and transparency,  were shared by staff, faculty and students, serving as a starting point for conversations and deciding values the University wants to build.   Carol Faull, a senior consultant with 1-degree, has been working with USC since August to identify the current experience, build the aspired culture and train USC facilitators. Faull said the company wanted to increase transparency by sharing results in a town hall format, both at the University and individual college level. “It’s not intended to be a destination, it’s a journey,” Freeman said. “So I think we need to remind people that we are just beginning.” Kimberly Freeman, the associate dean and chief diversity officer at Dornsife, said the results of the poll would help identify the key areas that the school needs to improve on and help in bringing the right support to different communities on campus. The University’s Culture Journey is in partnership with 1-degree, an experienced Barrett Values Centre that created the poll and helps organizations build and sustain values-driven culture. The process consists of the poll, reportings through Town Hall meetings and discussion sessions.last_img read more