14 01 20

first_imgNo matter the language, the verdict is the same. There can be no progress without peace, no growth without peace, no development without peace and no healing without peace and forgiveness.The outbreak of the deadly Ebola virus will not be burnt out without peace and the cooperation of everyone.It would take a super human coordinated effort from everyone and the support from international community, working in unity, cohesion and in peace time to burn out Ebola virus disease (EVD) in the region. We need this synergy to combat Ebola disease.Over the weekend, Messengers of Peace (MOP)-Liberia, through funding support from Gbowee Peace Foundation Africa, conducted a three-day Ebola Education Outreach Program in four communities, including Clara Town, Newport, Buchanan and Carey Streets. The outcome of the education outreach was frightening as we discovered that most young people are still in denial and have limited information on the spread of Ebola, symptoms, prevention and control measures.Sometimes, in unprecedented situations like this, we might have to look back, especially at the epicenter of the outbreak, to see where we are going and how we are doing. We need to re-examine our strategy to curb this disease. We also need to examine the integrated nature of EVD and its interconnectedness. The death of one Liberian affects us all.It is our opinion that the spread of EVD is systemic and we need a systemic approach to deal with it. To prevent and control EVD, the Government of Liberia (GOL) needs to develop an excellent contact tracking system, to include weekly reporting and solicitation of support from members of the public. We need to enforce the quarantine of persons who have come in close contact with infected individual(s); we need a good laboratory system to address the issue of false negative laboratory results and we need improved as well as increase access to and strengthen our health care facilities. Efforts should be put in place to normalize governance and address on going austerity measures. The closure of schools and other public institutions affects our livelihood.As young people, we do have a major role to play in the prevention and control of EVD. The disease has put a severe strain on our health system, our health workers and others.We need to show restraints and adhere to measures put in place by authorities. Don’t put your family and other community in danger; don’t go around to others if you are exhibiting symptoms of Ebola. Call the health hotlines immediately and listen to your health workers; they know best how to help you.There is need for order and orderliness. Patience, as our overwhelmed first responders put in place control measures. High standards of hygiene practices should be encouraged. We are happy to see the use of chlorinated water and soap in public places.The need for tolerance, respect, and discipline during this unusual time cannot be overemphasized. Most importantly, we need to give support to individuals, families, communities, national and international assistance.Ultimately, like all viral diseases, Ebola would burn itself out, don’t get burnt out with it. Be part of a collective action to burn out Ebola from the region. According to Kwame Nkrumah-the former President of Ghana- “We face neither East not West, We face forward”We are grateful for the support received thus far, especially with the news to give the drug ZMapp to infected persons in Liberia. There is need to do more. We concur with President Obama that the Ebola virus, is controllable if we have a strong public health infrastructure. At MOP, we believe we can burn out Ebola if we have a resilient young population to provide much need education, help dispel rumors and allay fear.Until next week, Peace First, Peace, above all, May Peace PrevailShare this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

21 12 19

first_imgBesitkas want Adel Taarabt, according to Turkish media reports. The Istanbul-based club are said to have identified Taarabt as a possible replacement for Manuel Fernandes who recently left them to join Lokomotiv Moscow.Taarabt ended last season on loan at AC Milan from QPR and is desperate to move to the San Siro this summer. Related West London Sport story: Rangers want £6m to sell TaarabtTaarabt’s future is uncertain following his return to Rangers.Reports in the Netherlands suggest Napoli are interested in QPR transfer target Jonathan de Guzman.Napoli’s former Liverpool and Chelsea boss Rafael Benitez is said to have identified Dutch international De Guzman as a possible signing if he misses out on other targets.Rangers are confident of completing a deal to sign the Villarreal midfielder, who has spent the last two seasons on loan at Swansea. Related West London Sport story: QPR ready to agree £7m De Guzman dealQPR have indicated they will pay £7m for De GuzmanMeanwhile, Hamburg chairman Dietmar Beiersdorfer has insisted he wants Rafael van der Vaart to stay at the German club after Harry Redknapp declared an interest in signing the player.Van der Vaart, 31, played under R’s boss Redknapp at Tottenham and would like to return to the Premier League.But Beiersdorfer told Bild: “He’s irreplaceable. It would be very hard for us to do without him.” Related West London Sport story: Redknapp confirms interest in Van der VaartVan der Vaart is one of several possible signings of interest to Redknapp. For more transfer speculation see Wednesday morning’s Paper Talk See also:QPR linked with Boussoufa and former Arsenal midfielder SongFollow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

21 12 19

first_imgFERNDALE >> St. Bernard’s quarterback Jack Rice threw for five touchdowns and 313 yards, 225 of those to receiver Isaac Drake, as the Crusaders defeated the Ferndale Wildcats, 49-21, Saturday at Ferndale High School — securing its fourth-consecutive Little 4 championship under head coach Matt Tomlin.“I’m really happy with my guys,” Tomlin said. “Our goal today was that we wanted to play as fast and physical as we could and I think the scoreboard showed that.”Tomlin added that he was most …last_img

19 12 19

first_imgThe optimistic title, “Humans could survive Mars visit,” belies the bad news in the body of the article on BBC News.  The article reports on findings announced at the annual meeting of the American Geophysical Union, based on data from the Mars Odyssey spacecraft instrument, Mars Radiation Environment Experiment (MARIE), which, unfortunately, stopped working after October’s record solar flares (See Nov. 6 headline).  It gathered enough data before its demise to characterize the risks of radiation to humans on Mars.  Though the hazards are twice those experienced on the space station, scientists feel they are survivable enough to allow for limited manned exploration of the red planet.This might be rephrased as an old-fashioned bad-news, good-news joke.Bad news: Mars has no protective magnetic field, so is bombarded by deadly radiation.  If you go, you would be at high risk of cancer, cataracts, nervous system damage, and other unknown health problems.Good news: You could live underground.(Visited 7 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

18 12 19

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Bill Mullen, Director of Agronomic Services with Seed Consultants, takes two corn plants from the same row to show the variability that Ohio corn fields are showing after a very challenging growing season. He also talks about the stalk quality issues that may force farmers to harvest early this year.last_img

18 12 19

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Today USDA Secretary Tom Vilsack announced that avian influenza, which devastated poultry operations around the country in 2015, was discovered on an Indiana farm.“Unfortunately we have had a reemergence of avian influenza in a facility in Indiana. We found out about it yesterday. We sent the lab sample and basically confirmed it as the North American variety. We are sending an emergency response team to the farm in question and we will begin the process of depopulation quickly,” he said. “We want to encourage folks to be ever vigilant on the biosecurity of their operations. We are hopeful to contain this as best we can. We were aware this could happen. We were hopeful that it wouldn’t. We want to be as responsive as we possibly can.”The USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) has confirmed the presence of highly pathogenic H7N8 avian influenza (HPAI) in a commercial turkey flock in Dubois County, Indiana.  This is a different strain of HPAI than the strains that caused the 2015 outbreak.  There are no known cases of H7N8 infections in humans.  As a reminder, the proper handling and cooking of poultry and eggs to an internal temperature of 165  degrees F kills bacteria and viruses, including HPAI.Samples from the turkey flock, which experienced increased mortality, were tested at the Indiana Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory at Purdue University, which is a part of USDA’s National Animal Health Laboratory Network, and confirmed by USDA this morning. APHIS is working closely with the Indiana State Board of Animal Health on a joint incident response. State officials quarantined the affected premises and depopulation of birds on the premises has already begun. Depopulation prevents the spread of the disease. Birds from the flock will not enter the food system.As part of existing avian influenza response plans, Federal and State partners are working jointly on additional surveillance and testing in the nearby area. The rapid testing and response in this incident is the result of months of planning with local, state, federal and industry partners to ensure the most efficient and effective coordination. Since the previous HPAI detections in 2015, APHIS and its state and industry partners have learned valuable lessons to help implement stronger preparedness and response capabilities. In September, APHIS published a HPAI Fall Preparedness and Response Plan that captures the results of this planning effort, organizing information on preparatory activities, policy decisions and updated strategy documents.The United States has the strongest AI surveillance program in the world, and USDA is working with its partners to actively look for the disease in commercial poultry operations, live bird markets and in migratory wild bird populations.Anyone involved with poultry production, from the small backyard to the large commercial producer, should review their biosecurity activities to assure the health of their birds. To facilitate such a review, a biosecurity self-assessment and educational materials can be found at http://www.uspoultry.org/animal_husbandry/intro.cfmIn addition to practicing good biosecurity, all bird owners should prevent contact between their birds and wild birds and report sick birds or unusual bird deaths to State/Federal officials, either through their state veterinarian or through USDA’s toll-free number at 1-866-536-7593.  Additional information on biosecurity for backyard flocks can be found at http://healthybirds.aphis.usda.gov.last_img read more

17 12 19

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Jerry HagstromDTN Political CorrespondentWASHINGTON (DTN) — While Friday’s announcement from China that it would suspend additional tariffs on U.S. pork is a good sign, China should remove the 60% punitive tariff it has placed on U.S. pork to ease its own rising pork prices and move along trade talks with the United States, National Pork Producers Council officials said.If the Chinese government would do this, “It would help their citizens,” who are experiencing rising pork prices due to African swine fever, NPPC President David Herring, a Lillington, North Carolina producer, said at a briefing for reporters Thursday following an NPPC fly-in to Washington.Early Friday, China announced it will suspend “additional tariffs” on pork, soybeans and other farm goods, Xinhua News Agency reported. Yet it is unclear exactly what level of tariffs Chinese officials committed to suspend, and the Associated Press reported phone calls to Chinese government agencies were not answered Friday because of a national holiday.“If media reports are accurate, this is a most welcome development,” Herring said in a statement Friday.Tariffs on U.S. pork increased another 10% on Sept. 1, making the retaliatory tariff 60%, tacked on to a traditional 12% duty already in place. That puts the full Chinese tariff on U.S. pork now at 72%. The inability of U.S. producers to export to China is costing pork producers $8 per animal sold, according to Dermot Hayes, an economist at Iowa State University.With China forced to kill pigs to stop the spread of African swine fever and Chinese production down 50%, U.S. producers should benefit, but the tariffs make U.S. pork too expensive to import, said Nick Giordano, NPPC vice president and counsel for global government affairs.U.S. pork producers are benefiting from rising world pork prices due to lower Chinese production, but the benefits would be so much greater if the U.S. industry could export to China, he said.“Our sector is one of those most impacted by the trade disputes,” Giordano said.Removing the tariff on U.S. pork, “Would be viewed favorably by our industry but, more importantly, by the U.S. government,” Giordano said.Instead of exporting higher volumes in a period of Chinese shortages, American producers are watching their competitors in other countries make those sales, he added. Most U.S. competitors only pay a 12% duty selling into China.China bought 237,800 metric tons of U.S. pork and variety meats from January through July of this year, according to USDA data, a 51% increase from low 2018 sales to China. In terms of volume, China is the second-largest market behind Mexico. Japan remains the top market for U.S. pork in terms of dollar value, while China is third behind Mexico.Data published by the European Commission on the EU’s pork exports show that, during the first half of 2019, EU exports to China grew by 42% compared to the same period in 2019, going from 680,686 metric tons in 2018 to 965,768 metric tons in 2019, according to the swine industry website www.pig333.com.Asked whether the fact that the Chinese tariffs are in retaliation for U.S. tariffs means that President Donald Trump should reduce American tariffs to encourage the Chinese to reduce theirs, Giordano said, “We don’t always talk publicly about our discussions with the administration. The administration understands that this has taken quite a toll on the industry.”The trade aid package has been welcome but has not made up for producers’ losses, the officials said.Jen Sorenson, an Iowa producer who is a vice president of the council, said that the trade aid has been “positive” because people who have not been able to afford pork now have it.The officials also called for approval of the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement on trade, and Giordano said he believes Congress will vote on it.DTN Ag Policy Editor Chris Clayton contributed to this report.Jerry Hagstrom can be reached at jhagstrom@njdc.comFollow him on Twitter @hagstromreport(CC/AG)© Copyright 2019 DTN/The Progressive Farmer. All rights reserved.last_img read more

12 12 19

first_imgBy Jennifer Rea“Babe, I’m thinking about applying to Officer Candidate School (OCS)…”My heart sank in my chest and my head ran to every negative connotation of my husband being in the military AGAIN—deployments at least 7 months long, everything falling apart, my anxiety and fear of being alone at night and the painful move as I left my family and friends for the first time.“Well, I don’t do life as just OK. I’m not the kind of person that does the 9 to 5 job and is happy with it… I need something more.”To provide you with a little background… my husband (JR) and I met in 6th grade for the very first time when he moved from private school to public school. In 6th grade, JR and I dated for a week, but broke up because one of my close friends wanted to date him… strange how things work out! We actually reconnected, at a more mature level, in our 10th grade Algebra class.It’s funny to me to look back on the first day of that Algebra class and remember that JR’s pick up line (via MSN Messenger) was “Hey, you looked beautiful today in math class! We should hang out sometime.” His courage and confidence anchored me in and I was hooked.My high school sweetheart became my husband on June 16, 2012—after 5 years and 8 months of dating (finally!). At that time, my husband had already been in the Marine Corps for two years and was stationed in Jacksonville, North Carolina. Much of our relationship at the time was long distance with emails, snail mail, Skype, Facebook, and MSN Messenger to help us stay connected while 1,300 miles apart—I thank God for technology!Two short days after we got married, JR and I spent our “honeymoon” packing up a U-Haul and my two-door Civic, driving cross country (from Minnesota to North Carolina) in separate vehicles…a perfect way to spend your honeymoon, right?We were both very excited as we had never lived together before and were finally together in the same house let alone in the same community for the first time in two years! With the happiness, there also came struggles and challenges for both of us. Learning to live together was one thing, but having to adapt to the military lifestyle and culture was another.I had never grown up with anyone that was close to me that was in the military besides my grandfathers, however they had been retired for several years so, I had never known what “military life” was like. I now believe that knowing what the military lifestyle can only be understood by the military family themselves. I say this not to offend anyone, but to point out that I personally have seen several differences between “military” and “civilian” life. The first, as a military family I conceptualize the absence of my husband being gone quite differently than I would have not being a military spouse. Although it is difficult when he is gone—I am very proud of my Marine for serving our country and having such dedication to his work.A second piece is that the military is a “culture”—it has its own language, way to act, and attire. I recognized this difference when I went on the military base for the first time. It was obvious who was not a service member based on the haircut and the attire and I definitely felt as if I stood out like a sore thumb!Another piece was trying to learn the language and all the acronyms! Many of the get-togethers we had at our house involved the gathering of service members that my husband worked with (his friends) and their spouses. When it was just me and the “guys” I had no idea what they were talking about and felt left out of the conversation several times due to their acronyms and work lingo—I was very thankful for the military spouses I had met, which brings me to my next item—a military family.As I had previously mentioned, the military is a culture and part of this culture involves several military families—this is the piece I loved the most! While not all military spouses get along, there are many military spouses that I could confide in and know that they would have my back no matter what. The part where you’re able to connect with someone going through the same situation as you and being in the “military spouse club” are things I really valued and enjoyed.I had never been that far away from my parents, my family and my friends so the whole transition was very difficult for me. I think JR struggled too, with looking for a way to help me, when really there wasn’t much he could do. I just needed to adjust so time and patience were key factors for me.The biggest thing that helped me adapt in the transition was being open and willing to meet new people, which I know was difficult at the time, even for me, as a social butterfly. Secondly, I got a job and I kept busy. I was actually enrolled in North Carolina State at the time to receive my M.S. in Family Life and Youth Development. I ran across a really great job—so, all of these things really helped me adjust. I also tried to continue the hobbies that I was used to doing in Minnesota, such as running, going to the gym, workout classes and crafting. I really enjoyed exploring the town and the Carolinas—of course, I can’t forget about the beach.So, fast-forward to the transition we are in now… honestly, I kind of saw it coming. JR had a really hard time “leaving the military” and transitioning to “civilian life”. The beginning of our drive home to Minnesota was very emotional for him—it was like he was leaving his family. I felt really bad for him and felt guilty that I “made” him decide to move back home. We struggled during this transition too, as change is hard for both of us. JR wasn’t happy with his civilian job and I honestly hate when he’s unhappy—I feel helpless.Watching JR in the “civilian world” was challenging. He hasn’t had anyone to really connect with unless he called his other service member buddies on the phone and man, those phone calls made his day! Again, it was almost as if he lost his family. The military had been part of his life for 5 years and he was used to the strict schedule, a consistent and reliable career with benefits, and was challenged with every day routines. I believe that the most difficult piece for JR was looking for a job—sending out resumes and going to interviews—this is something JR hadn’t done in 5 years! The second was financial. I know there were many times we talked about how we were going to pay our bills, and wondered if his job would be able to support us. It was stressful, but we were both on the same page on budgeting and managing our finances, so I think that helped a lot! And then JR found a job that was more stable than working construction, which helped with the financial piece and the benefits. For more “excitement” and to challenge his skills, JR applied to college and this really seemed to bring up his spirits. Many times he would come home from school and tell me all about class; what they talked about, how it relates to being in the military, and everything he had been learning. It was exciting and encouraging to know that he was “satisfied” with at least one piece in his life.So, the conversation came up several times, and I think we both really needed to soak it in. I was angry, sad and anxious at the thought of him being in the military again. I felt like it was his decision and he hadn’t even thought about “us.” Throughout the process, he kept saying, “I’m sorry… I don’t want to do this to you again.” And I just thought, “Well, don’t then.” I asked myself, “Can I do this again? What are the benefits and do they outweigh the downfalls?” I appreciated his sympathy and concern in the matter, but I struggled in understanding why he wanted to join again…I ended up reassuring myself that this was inevitably JR’s decision, however he had made the decision for us—for our future and our future family. I didn’t realize this until actually two weeks before he left for OCS. We had just been driving home after getting ice cream as I was stressed with finals and thinking about JR leaving. We had just pulled into the garage and I had asked him, “So, really, why do you want to join OCS?” And he looked at me and replied, “I want to do this for our family. I struggled growing up—not having the finances to be able to go to college, barely being able to pay the bills and all the other financial aspects— it really stresses me out and I don’t want that for our family. I want us to be able to travel, to take off and fly wherever we want, whenever we want. I also want our kids to be able to go to college and I want to financially support them. I love the thrill of being in the military, it’s fast pace and motivating, but also I enjoy the fact that it is simple for me—there are set hours, pay and benefits, but also opportunities for challenges and goals to achieve. I hate that I have to leave you again and miss you every time I’m gone—this is the worst part for me, and the reason why we got out in the first place. But the way I see it now, there are many more opportunities for us in the military then just saying here.” Amazed—is the word that I describe how I felt in this moment—JR always seems to amaze me and surprise me with what he believes, his opinions, and his drive—all the reasons why I wouldn’t want to be without him. So, we decided if he goes, I go.No one really understands why individuals want to join the military or better yet why someone would want to “follow” and go with them! But from my experience, I recognized that the individuals that do are amazingly selfless and humble people who want to make a difference in not only their lives, but a majority of their focus is to make a significant impact in the lives of others. This in itself motivated and encouraged me to “allow” or accept JR’s desire to re-enlist and apply to Officer Candidates School. I was also reassured by God’s love and knowing that he has BIG plans for JR and I—much greater than we would’ve ever thought! Oddly enough, I feel so incredibly blessed and thank God every day for JR. He is the most intelligent, caring, loving, selfless, and supportive man I have ever met! Together, we make a great team and a military family.Looking toward the future… I definitely see my future differently than I did when we had moved home to Minnesota last August. The biggest difference is knowing that I won’t be living in Minnesota for the rest of my life—this piece hurts, A LOT because it’s home—its where my family is, my friends, my memories, everything. The second item is my career. I am currently going to the University of Minnesota to receive my PhD in Family Social Science and I hope to teach in a university someday, however knowing that my husband is now becoming a Marine officer—it’s a slightly different story. For one, JR will be active duty again so, this means that there will be at least one year where we will have to manage long distance again, which sucks, but I want to finish my schooling here in Minnesota before moving from place-to-place. Secondly, there are not many universities near military bases, especially Marine Corps bases. So, currently, I’m envisioning that I will either teach at a community college, which could be fun or find a career working for the DoD or a military base – teaching, researching, or program design and evaluation. So, we’ll see! And the third is our future family. When we came home, I was thinking about having our first child when I was like 25, but now with my graduate program and JR going active duty again, we both have decided that children will have to wait a little bit longer—at least until JR gets somewhat permanently stationed and I finished my degree—sorry, Mom and Dad! So, the first major milestones, while we did purchase our first house in December, it looks like we’ll only be able to keep it for 3 years and then move to somewhere else, where I’m assuming we will probably have to rent/live on base. And then children probably a little later in life, around 27 years old—all of which can have its benefits and limitations.So, today… I haven’t seen JR in a month, not the longest we’ve been apart, but the most time we haven’t been able to talk since his first boot camp. For the first 3 weeks of OCS training, the only communication that we had with each other was snail mail! It’s been difficult not being able to come home and eat dinner with JR, go on walks, enjoy the summer weather, or simply share how our days went. Fortunately, after the third week, JR was able to call me and we Skyped for a while too so, that was really nice. It is hard for me to see him and talk to him, and then he has to leave and our communication gets completely cut off for a week—major bummer! During this time however I’ve been working at school, doing research, and working on a paper that is due later on in my program. As I had mentioned earlier, it is easier for me to deal with the transition and time apart if I stay busy and continue to send my brain messages that “it will be okay. He will be home soon!” I also make lots of plans to hang out with people because sometimes I really don’t feel like doing anything and if I stay home, I just get more sad and lonely. So, forcing myself to go out and spend time with good family and friends has been really helpful for me to get through this summer being away from JR.last_img read more

27 11 19

first_img‘We are too hospitable,’ says Sotto amid SEA Games woes “Something is changing,” Sarri said. “At the moment I am not able to see the reason but I have to work for this because my target is to play my football, not to change (to) another football because at the moment we are playing another football.”Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next US judge bars Trump’s health insurance rule for immigrants MOST READ ‘We are too hospitable,’ says Sotto amid SEA Games woes Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. SPORTSPalace wants Cayetano’s PHISGOC Foundation probed over corruption chargesIt was Chelsea’s third consecutive away loss in the league, following a 2-0 collapse at Arsenal and 4-0 humiliation against Bournemouth.And Sarri completing his first season in charge is now far from certain. PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games PLAY LIST 02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games02:11Trump awards medals to Jon Voight, Alison Krauss LATEST STORIES Private companies step in to help SEA Games hosting Oil plant explodes in Pampanga towncenter_img Grace Poe files bill to protect govt teachers from malicious accusations Oil plant explodes in Pampanga town Manchester City’s Sergio Aguero celebrates after scoring his side’s fifth goal during the English Premier League soccer match between Manchester City and Chelsea at Etihad stadium in Manchester, England, Sunday, Feb. 10, 2019. (AP Photo/Jon Super)MANCHESTER, England — Chelsea was handed its heaviest loss in 28 years on Sunday when Manchester City routed Maurizio Sarri’s side 6-0 in the Premier League.The meeting of the last two champions was a complete mismatch as Sergio Aguero scored a hat trick for the second successive weekend.ADVERTISEMENT City regained top spot from Liverpool in its title defense as 2017 champion Chelsea ended the weekend by dropping out of the Champions League places into sixth.Raheem Sterling scored twice — City’s opener in the fourth minute and the sixth in the 80th — and Ilkay Gundogan also netted.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSUrgent reply from Philippine ‍football chief Clink, clink: Lindsey Vonn walks away with another medal “I don’t know, you have to ask the club,” said Sarri, who was hired after leaving Napoli. “I am worried about my team, I am worried about the performance but my job is always at risk so I am not worried about the club — you have to ask the club.“I didn’t see my football (against City). At the beginning (of the season) it worked. So now we need only to understand the reasons why at the moment it isn’t working … It is not easy. At the beginning, we played better away than at home. Now we are playing better at home than away.”Chelsea had not lost by six goals or more since April 1991 — a year before the inception of the Premier League — when Nottingham Forest beat the west London club 7-0.Chelsea was un-picked after only four minutes at the Etihad Stadium. With a cleverly taken free kick down the right, Kevin De Bruyne released Bernardo Silva, who cut back for Sterling to strike into the net.“I think we started well then we conceded the goal after four minutes in a stupid way,” Sarri said. “In that moment, we needed to stay in the match and we were not able to because we made a lot of mistakes against the wrong opponents.”ADVERTISEMENT SEA Games hosting troubles anger Duterte The match also saw a mistake by Aguero.Aguero should have doubled the lead almost immediately but remarkably missed from close range. Silva had weaved through the area to set up a gilt-edged opportunity but the Argentina forward uncharacteristically poked wide.Manager Pep Guardiola sank to his knees in frustration but he was soon celebrating as Aguero made amends in sensational fashion. The striker played a one-two with Oleksandr Zinchenko outside the area and then unleashed a powerful shot that flew in from 25 yards (meters) in the 13th minute.“Out of nothing,” Sterling said, “he can put the ball in the top corner and players like this, you have got to cherish.”Aguero’s second was gifted to him six minutes later. David Luiz headed clear but Ross Barkley inexplicably headed back into the danger area. Aguero was lurking in the six-yard box and punished the former Everton midfielder with a sharp turn and shot.Chelsea hardly had time to take stock before the visitors conceded again, with Gundogan slotting home in the 25th with a neat shot from the edge after a poor clearance from Antonio Rudiger.City eased off for the remainder of the first half, and Chelsea striker Gonzalo Higuain even managed to test goalkeeper Ederson with a sharp volley.Although Aguero headed against the crossbar early in the second half, he only had to wait until the 56th to seal his 15th City hat trick — and a record-equaling 11th in the Premier League with Alan Shearer. Sterling was brought down in the box by Cesar Azpilicueta and Aguero stepped up and sent Kepa Arrizabalaga the wrong way from the spot.There seemed to be no let-up from City with De Bruyne firing a free kick at Arrizabalaga and Aguero shooting into the side-netting.Sterling wrapped up a brilliant afternoon’s work after substitute David Silva opened up the Chelsea defense yet again and Zinchenko picked out the winger to tap in from close range. View commentslast_img read more