28 10 19

first_imgAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Watford manager Sanchez Flores explains Welbeck setbackby Paul Vegas4 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveWatford manager Quique Sanchez Flores says Danny Welbeck injured his ankle and not his hamstring.The forward went down clutching his hamstring with barely a minute on the clock and was eventually substituted in Saturday’s 1-1 draw with Tottenham.Sanchez Flores said: “I was talking about him in the last press conference about how he’s fighting with this injury.”We know he’s happy to be with us, with the team. During the week he was good.”He didn’t complain about anything and our feeling with him was really good, but the ankle is uncomfortable.” last_img

28 10 19

first_imgAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Liverpool boss Klopp insists Keita close to top formby Paul Vegas2 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveLiverpool boss Jurgen Klopp insists it wont be long until Naby Keita hits his full stride.The Guinea international put in an impressive cameo in last Sunday’s draw with Manchester United and is expected to start against Genk on Wednesday.Asked when fans can expect to see the 24-year-old’s best form, the manager replied: “Soon.”I don’t know when he will start but Naby is one-and-a-half or two weeks in full training roundabout. And he looks good in training, really good.”They all look good in training, that’s why we made the changes that we made [at Old Trafford] because we really knew they can have an impact in that game. I was really happy.That was the best news of the whole day – not the result, not the goal we scored, which was nice – but that these three guys, very important players for us, in a moment when it’s not easy to have rhythm or get rhythm when you don’t play that much, can perform like this in a game.”In training I see it a lot, so that was the best news. It will not be long anymore.” last_img read more

15 10 19

first_imgAdvertisement Advertisement Advertisement TORONTO – Fans of influential horror director George Romero are being invited to gather at a public memorial on Monday.A celebration of the “Night of the Living Dead” director’s life will take place in Toronto, according to details provided by his manager.Romero died Sunday following a battle with lung cancer, according to a statement from his family. The director is credited with reshaping the zombie film genre with his classic “Night of the Living Dead” and its various sequels. He also directed a number of other horror films including “Monkey Shines” and “The Dark Half.”Romero moved to Toronto in 2004 where he shot many of his later films.Monday’s public memorial will be held at the Mount Pleasant Funeral Centre from 2 p.m. to 8 p.m.Guests unable to attend the memorial can sign an online guest book: https://mountpleasantgroup.permavita.com/site/RomeroGeorgeA.html Twitter Login/Register With: Facebook LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment last_img read more

18 07 19

first_img Source:https://www.sissa.it/news/submicroscopic-spacecrafts-graphene-flakes-control-neuron-activity Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)May 10 2019Like in a science fiction novel, miniscule spacecrafts able to reach a specific site of the brain and influence the operation of specific types of neurons or drug delivery: graphene flakes, the subject matter of the new study of the group of SISSA professor Laura Ballerini, open up truly futuristic horizons. With the researcher, Rossana Rauti, Ballerini is responsible for the study recently published in the journal “Nano Letters”. Measuring just one millionth of a metre, these particles have proven able to interfere with the transmission of the signal at excitatory neuronal synaptic junctions Furthermore, the study has shown that they do so in a reversible manner, because they disappear without leaving a trace few days after they have been administered. Basic research, which, thanks to this positive evidence, could initiate further studies, geared to investigating the possible therapeutic effects for the treatment of problems, such as epilepsy, in which an excess of the activity of the excitatory neurons is recorded or to study innovative ways to transport therapeutic substances in situ. The research, carried out in association with the universities of Trieste, Manchester and Strasbourg, is conducted within the Graphene Flagship, the substantial funding project of the European Union, which aims to investigate the potential of graphene in the most diverse areas of application, from the biomedical to the industrial ones.A selective and reversible effect”We reported in in vitro models that these small flakes interfered with the transmission of the signals from one neuron to another acting at specific zones called synapses which are crucial to the operation of our nervous system” explain Ballerini and Rauti. “The interesting thing is that their action is selective on specific synapses, namely those formed by neurons that in our brain have the role to excite (activate) their target neurons. We wanted to understand if this holds true not only in in vitro experiments but also inside an organism, with all the variable potential and complexity which derives from it”. The result was more than positive. “In our models we analysed the activity of the hippocampus, a specific area of the brain, injecting the flakes into that site. What we saw, thanks to fluorescent tracers, is that the particles effectively insinuate themselves only inside the synapses of excitatory neurons. In this way, they interfere with the activity of these cells. In addition, they do so with a reversible effect: after 72 hours, the physiological mechanisms of clearance of the brain completely removed all the flakes.Related StoriesCompelling New Evidence Further Suggests Parkinson’s Disease Begins in the GutNew insights into molecular motors could help treat neurological disordersAnti-aging protein hormone Klotho shown to be neuroprotective in ALS modelNeither big nor small: how the flakes workThe interest in the procedure, explain the researchers, also lies in the fact that the flakes are apparently well tolerated once injected into the organism: “The inflammatory response and the immune reaction has proved lower than that recorded when administering simple saline solution. This is very important for possible therapeutic purposes”. The specificity of the action of the flakes, explained the researchers, would reside in the size of the particles used. They cannot be bigger or smaller than those adopted for this study (which measured approx. 100-200 nanometres of diameter): “Size is probably at the root of selectivity: if the flakes are too big they are unable to penetrate the synapse, which are very narrow areas between one neuron and the other. If they are too small, they are presumably simply wiped out ultimately in both cases no effects on synapses were observed”. The research will now explore the potential developments of this discovery, with a possible therapeutic horizon of definite interest for different pathologies.last_img read more