New trustees join UVM board

Posted on January 1, 2021Categories sqfxhpcjTags , , , , , , , , , , ,   Leave a comment on New trustees join UVM board

first_imgUniversity of Vermont,The University of Vermont has announced that three new legislative trustees, a gubernatorial appointee, and a new student trustee are joining its board of trustees. The new legislative trustees, elected by the Vermont General Assembly to six-year terms, are Carolyn Branagan, Christopher Bray, and David Potter. Governor Douglas has appointed Mark Young, who previously served as a legislative trustee from 2002-2007, to a six-year term. The new student trustee, Adam Roof, was selected to serve a two-year term by the Associate Directors for the Appointment of The University of Vermont and State Agricultural College Student Trustees, Inc.Leaving the board are legislative trustees Edwin Amidon, James Leddy, and Martha Heath, gubernatorial appointed trustee Robert Young, and student trustee Beth Rice.All of the new trustees will participate in the board meeting scheduled for May 14 through 16.Branagan, a Republican from Georgia, has served in the Vermont House of Representatives since 2003. She was the House Education Committee clerk from 2003 to 2004 and is the House Ways and Means Committee ranking member in 2009/10. She is the Franklin County Republican Committee chair and is a member of the Governor’s Commission on International Education. She has also served as co-chair of the Vermont Legislative Women’s Caucus, chair of the Georgia School Board; member of the coordinating council of Vermont Interactive Television; and trustee and chair of the Vermont Maple Festival. She received B.S. and M.Ed. degrees from UVM.Bray, a Democrat from New Haven, has served in the Vermont House of Representatives since 2007. Formerly he taught at UVM for four years in the English department and founded Common Grounds Communications, which provides writing, editing, design and production services to a variety of clients and publishing houses. He is clerk of the House Agricultural Committee ; secretary of the Vermont Milk Commission; chair of the Rural Economic Development Working Group.; and member of the Vermont Forestry Commission and the Economic Development Committee of the Governor’s Dairy Task Force. He received a B.A degree from UVM in Zoology and an M.A. in English. He also graduated from UVM’s Snelling Center for Government.Potter, a Democrat from Clarendon, has served in the Vermont House of Representatives since 2005. Potter taught at Rutland High School for 31 years before retiring and was on active duty in the Air Force for 10 years. He is a member or affiliate of the West Rutland Rotary; the Rutland County Audubon Society; the Vermont Federation of Sportsman Clubs; the Rutland Regional Transportation Council; the Vermont Workforce Development Council; the Clarendon Selectboard; the Clarendon Planning Commission; the National Guard Association of the U.S.; the Vermont Sugarmakers Association; and the Vermont Woodland Association. In 2008 he was named Vermont Tree Farmer of the Year. He is a retired member of the Vermont Air National Guard, SQ Commander, Lt. Col.Young, of Orwell, is president and CEO of the First National Bank of Orwell. He currently serves as the Town of Orwell treasurer and trustee of Public Funds. He is a board member of Union Mutual of Vermont Companies and the Vermont Center for the Book and is a member of the Vermont Economic Progress Council. He was a member of the Vermont House of Representatives from 1993-2006. He is a past chair of the executive committee of the Vermont Bankers Association and received the Vermont Bankers Association Outstanding Community Service Banker Award in 2001.Roof, of South Walpole, Mass., is currently enrolled in the College of Arts and Sciences, majoring in Political Science and English. He serves on the Peer Judicial Board in the Harris/Millis residential complex, and is a member of the Dean of Students Advisory Board and the Men’s Club Hockey Team.last_img read more

A donor-conceived woman speaks out

Posted on September 27, 2020Categories foxhpqlgTags , , , , , , , , , , ,   Leave a comment on A donor-conceived woman speaks out

first_imgMercatorNet 3 February 2016The Belgian advertising industry recently launched a campaign to support sperm donation. Award-winning men donated theirs to boost national creativity. As the child of an anonymous donor, what did you think of it?I found it an appalling campaign for many reasons. In the first place, their claim is pure nonsense. A creative gene does not exist. Studies prove that the environment where one grows up is more likely to contribute to one’s creativity. Stating that you can create creative people by letting “creative” men donate their sperm is utter fiction. In a YouTube video clip you can see the head of a genetics department supporting this fiction. Because of this I filed an official complaint against her hospital: they are actually lying in the hope of attracting more donors and clients.It is selling out on so many levels but up mostly it is a sell-out at the expense of the children that are going to be conceived by this sperm. Those children will not be allowed to know whom they descent from and will live their lives trying to fill the gaps in their identity. They will have a huge hole deliberately inflicted by others. They will have no access to their full medical record and will have no means to track down their biological father and potentially a dozen siblings.Imagine you are one of the donor-conceived persons that was created by one of this guys’ sperm. You will have to live with the knowledge that your biological father did this purely to get his five minutes of fame. The child will end up in a family knowing that his own biological father preferred to give him away to total strangers than to raise his own child.These young guys clearly didn’t think it through whilst brainstorming on their bright coloured Fat Boys. I sincerely hope their sperm wasn’t good enough to be used. But if so, we have gathered all the information we could find on them and put it in our database of potential donors. It will at least make the search of some children that much easier.What is your own background?My name is Stephanie. I am Belgian, 37 years old and donor-conceived. My story starts with two persons: my mother and father. My mother wanted to have children. They desperately tried to conceive. When they didn’t get pregnant they went to see a specialist.This doctor diagnosed infertility in my father and suggested a “fertility treatment” with the sperm of a man who resembled my father. They paid a lot of money and signed a document. My mother got hormones and they were told that if they did conceive, they should never to tell the truth to the child and even the people around them.I am an “end product” of the first official sperm bank in Belgium.My mother was inseminated in the spring of 1978 and in January 1979 I was born. But I wasn’t alone: a brother and a sister joined me. We are triplets. We often cynically joke that they got three for the price of one.I always experienced a distance between my father and myself. Somehow I could not connect with him. As child you long for the acknowledgement of your parents; you want to be loved, cherished and accepted. But for whatever reason we had very little in common: we didn’t resemble each other and we had different interests. He didn’t grasp my being, my sense of humour. The love I felt for him, however, was unconditional.As a child you don’t question the reality that is presented by your parents. I never questioned our ancestry. I even wasn’t aware that a treatment with the sperm of someone else was possible.READ MORE: http://www.mercatornet.com/articles/view/a-donor-conceived-woman-speaks-out/17550last_img read more