Vermont legislature passes school “green” cleaning bill

Posted on January 1, 2021Categories pjgcjovxTags , , , , , , , , , ,   Leave a comment on Vermont legislature passes school “green” cleaning bill

first_imgOn Thursday, the Senate gave final approval to S.92, a bill that requires manufacturers and distributors of cleaning products to only sell environmentally preferable cleaning products to schools. The bill will now make its way to the Governor’s desk for his signature.‘This legislation will create safer and healthier learning environments in our schools,’ said Charity Carbine-March, environmental health advocate for Vermont Public Interest Research Group (VPIRG). ‘Children in classrooms across Vermont will soon be breathing easier.’Conventional cleaning supplies can contain toxic chemicals that have been linked to asthma, cancer, and other negative health effects. These chemicals can pollute indoor air and impact the health of students and staff. Advocates and other experts agree that environmentally preferable cleaning products are just as effective and affordable as conventional supplies. In fact, Vermont’s state buildings have already transitioned to ‘green’ cleaning products as a result of the Clean State Program created by an executive order signed by Governor Douglas in 2004. In addition, many schools in Vermont have voluntarily made the switch to safer products.‘There are clear benefits to using green cleaning supplies,’ said Carol Westinghouse, President of Informed Green Solutions, a non-profit organization that helps schools transition to safer cleaning products. ‘After making the switch, some schools in Vermont have reported fewer instances of asthma cases, nausea, and headaches, and others have even reported saving money on the cost of cleaning supplies.’‘This bill will protect generations of Vermont children from the effects of toxic chemicals. With asthma at epidemic proportions, any actions we can take to remove asthma triggers from our schools will make a difference,’ said Cindy Murphy, a school nurse at Main Street Middle School in Montpelier. ‘It’s a community’s responsibility to provide optimal health and safety for school age children whose bodies are not fully developed and, therefore, are most effected by toxic chemicals. Green cleaning policies serve as a strong educational tool for staff and students.’S.92 was brought to the brink of passage during last year’s legislative session. The bill began in the Senate and was passed on the floor by a vote of 29 to 0. The bill was then passed by the House (92 to 38) and was further amended by the Senate on the last day of session. The House took the bill up for immediate consideration upon the return of the legislature this year and gave their final nod of approval just last week.last_img read more

Freshman running back Stephen Carr is raring to go

Posted on September 16, 2020Categories pjgcjovxTags , , , , , , , , , , ,   Leave a comment on Freshman running back Stephen Carr is raring to go

first_imgStephen Carr | Daily TrojanStanding at 6 feet and weighing 210 pounds, running back Stephen Carr sure doesn’t look like a freshman. As we’ve learned the past two weeks, he doesn’t play like one either. A four-star recruit from Summit High School in Fontana, Calif., Carr turned heads in his first two games in a USC uniform. Carr ran for 188 yards on 18 carries while also picking up 41 yards in the receiving game. “Explosiveness”: That’s the word that comes to head coach Clay Helton’s mind when talking about the freshman running back. When the Trojans held a narrow 35-31 lead over Western Michigan with three minutes to go in the game, USC was looking to move the chains and eat up some time. Carr had other plans, breaking off a 52-yard run that all but ended the game. Carr’s big play ability has been evident, with a 52-yard run in each of the first two games. “Every time he touches the ball, you kind of hold your breath,” Helton said.The transition from high school football to the college game is substantial. Many recruits get lost once they’re forced to learn more concepts and fundamentals. To Carr, the biggest change has been in the speed of the game and the Xs and Os. “It’s much faster up here and you have to make sure you’re on your stuff every play,” Carr said. “It’s not like high school where, because you’re an elite athlete, you get that little room to relax a little bit. Up here, you have to be on every snap.”After arriving on campus, Carr has put in the work, and offensive coordinator Tee Martin believes it’s paying off. Helped by teammates such as junior running back Ronald Jones II, Carr has quickly caught up to the NCAA level of competitive edge. It was a surprise to Martin and the other coaches to see a young player adapt so quickly, but once Carr showed his promise in practice, the coaching staff felt comfortable trusting him in game situations.“He’s doing a real good job as a true freshman to understand our protections, run schemes, footwork and eyes,” Martin said. “It wasn’t a surprise with how he’s playing in games because he’s been doing it consistently in practice.”Carr has made the most of the reps he’s gotten in practice. He bought into the program’s intensity immediately, a mentality that Carr believes is part of the reason he’s been able to contribute so early. The Trojans emphasize attacking at full speed on every play, and that pressure to finish plays and push at a high pace prepared Carr in the offseason to perform at his current level.As other highly touted recruits around the country are working hard to see the field, Carr is already looking like an integral part of USC’s offense. His ability to push through tackles — a theme for this year’s backfield — has paid off as well.“I think some people think of him as kind of a scat back, but when they get up on him and try to hit him they’re bouncing off him,” Martin said. “When you look at his yards after contact, they’re right up there with the best. He’s a complete back.”As far as what Carr’s ceiling is, it’s too early to say. But despite his talent, running backs coach Deland McCullough thinks it is important to keep young athletes levelheaded as their star begins to rise. “He’s pretty doggone good,” McCullough said. “But again, I continue to keep them grounded. I’ve told them ‘I’ve coached guys who have sat in your same seat, I sat in your seat, and we’ve had some success playing the game.’ But as soon as you start hearing how good you are and all these different things like that, you could be setting yourself up for failure.”Carr has had a best-case-scenario start to the 2017 season, but the Trojans have only played two games, and there’s much more work to do. Helton hopes to see him grow in his ability to protect the pass. McCullough wants to build both his confidence and his calmness in big-game situations. But both coaches have one way to describe Carr’s talent: special. For the rest of the season, Carr’s goals are simple: to make the most of every opportunity. He’s made a splash in his first two weeks, but the work is only getting started for No. 7.last_img read more