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first_imgThai AirAsia X, Thailand’s first low-fare, long-haul carrier announced today that the airline will be flying from Narita and Osaka to Bangkok from September 1 2014.The airline started flying to Seoul, Korea from Bangkok in June of this year and today’s announcement confirmed that Japan would be the second country to be served by Thai AirAsia X.About AirAsia X and Thai AirAsia XAirAsia X is the low-cost, long-haul affiliate carrier of the AirAsia Group that currently flies to destinations in China, Australia, Taiwan, Korea, Japan, Sri Lanka, Nepal and the Middle East from it’s base in Kuala Lumpur.  AirAsia X currently operates a fleet of 16 Airbus A330-300s, each with a seat configuration of 12 Business Class Premium Flatbeds and 365 Economy seats.  Thai AirAsia X, an affiliate of AirAsia X will operate a fleet of 2 Airbus A330-300s, each with a seat configuration of 12 Premium Flatbeds and 365 Economy seats (a total of 377 seats).  The airline will operate out of Bangkok’s secondary airport, Don Mueang.For more information on AirAsia X see herelast_img read more

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first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Today USDA Secretary Tom Vilsack announced that avian influenza, which devastated poultry operations around the country in 2015, was discovered on an Indiana farm.“Unfortunately we have had a reemergence of avian influenza in a facility in Indiana. We found out about it yesterday. We sent the lab sample and basically confirmed it as the North American variety. We are sending an emergency response team to the farm in question and we will begin the process of depopulation quickly,” he said. “We want to encourage folks to be ever vigilant on the biosecurity of their operations. We are hopeful to contain this as best we can. We were aware this could happen. We were hopeful that it wouldn’t. We want to be as responsive as we possibly can.”The USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) has confirmed the presence of highly pathogenic H7N8 avian influenza (HPAI) in a commercial turkey flock in Dubois County, Indiana.  This is a different strain of HPAI than the strains that caused the 2015 outbreak.  There are no known cases of H7N8 infections in humans.  As a reminder, the proper handling and cooking of poultry and eggs to an internal temperature of 165  degrees F kills bacteria and viruses, including HPAI.Samples from the turkey flock, which experienced increased mortality, were tested at the Indiana Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory at Purdue University, which is a part of USDA’s National Animal Health Laboratory Network, and confirmed by USDA this morning. APHIS is working closely with the Indiana State Board of Animal Health on a joint incident response. State officials quarantined the affected premises and depopulation of birds on the premises has already begun. Depopulation prevents the spread of the disease. Birds from the flock will not enter the food system.As part of existing avian influenza response plans, Federal and State partners are working jointly on additional surveillance and testing in the nearby area. The rapid testing and response in this incident is the result of months of planning with local, state, federal and industry partners to ensure the most efficient and effective coordination. Since the previous HPAI detections in 2015, APHIS and its state and industry partners have learned valuable lessons to help implement stronger preparedness and response capabilities. In September, APHIS published a HPAI Fall Preparedness and Response Plan that captures the results of this planning effort, organizing information on preparatory activities, policy decisions and updated strategy documents.The United States has the strongest AI surveillance program in the world, and USDA is working with its partners to actively look for the disease in commercial poultry operations, live bird markets and in migratory wild bird populations.Anyone involved with poultry production, from the small backyard to the large commercial producer, should review their biosecurity activities to assure the health of their birds. To facilitate such a review, a biosecurity self-assessment and educational materials can be found at http://www.uspoultry.org/animal_husbandry/intro.cfmIn addition to practicing good biosecurity, all bird owners should prevent contact between their birds and wild birds and report sick birds or unusual bird deaths to State/Federal officials, either through their state veterinarian or through USDA’s toll-free number at 1-866-536-7593.  Additional information on biosecurity for backyard flocks can be found at http://healthybirds.aphis.usda.gov.last_img read more

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first_imgSince 2010 Apple has been suing everybody in sight for allegedly infringing on its intellectual property. Apple hasn’t just been suing its rivals but also portraying itself as a beacon of innovation and depicting its rivals as cloners and copycats — thieves, basically.So perhaps there is some satisfaction in seeing Apple get smacked for the very thing it keeps accusing others of doing.Yesterday a federal court in Dallas ruled that Apple must pay $368.2 million to a patent troll called VirnetX because its FaceTime videoconferencing software infringes on some patents owned by VirnetX.That’s pocket change to Apple, which posted $41.7 billion in net profit on $156.5 billion in revenues in the fiscal year that ended in September.But VirnetX wants more — it has filed a complaint with the International Trade Commission asking to have a bunch of Apple products (iPhone, iPad, Macs) banned from the market. Apple has no comment. But of course Apple will appeal, and of course the case will drag on.What Is The Point?And of course this is all lunacy. The real lesson to this and all of the other Apple-related cases is that the patent system is ridiculous and has become an obstacle to innovation, one whose ultimate victims are customers.In the tech world it’s considered depicable when trolls like VirnetX use patents to shake companies down for money.But is it any less despicable to cynically use the legal system to put a spoke in the wheel of your rivals? Or to use the legal system as a kind of marketing tool, a way to smear your opponents?Because that’s what Apple is doing with its cases against Samsung, HTC and Motorola. Apple doesn’t want to set up licensing agreements. Apple just wants to distract its opponents and slow them down. Marketing By LawsuitApple’s patent lawsuits are also a form of marketing, albeit an expensive one, whose goal is to generate lots of stories in the media and to hammer home, via repetition, the notion that everyone else in the smartphone market is simply copying Apple, producing me-too clones that are poor imitations of the iPhone and iPad.One court in England saw through the charade and resented the notion of being used as a propaganda tool by a large multinational corporation.Consequently the court ordered Apple to apologize publicly to Samsung for making false allegations and buy advertisements declaring that Samsung did not, in fact, copy Apple.Apple shamelessly and brazenly tried to turn that to its advantage, creating an “apology” that was really just another ad taunting Samsung. The annoyed judges ordered Apple to do the apology again, only this time to follow their instructions. The good news is that these lawsuits, all of them, are just speedbumps that will not stop the mobile revolution and probably won’t affect the balance of power in the smartphone market.Back in 2010, when Apple first launched its legal jihad against Android phone makers, Android had 23% market share and Apple had 15%. Today Apple still has the same 15% share — but Android now holds 75%.So much for the efficacy of lawsuits as competitive weapons. Someday, I hope, companies will figure out that these things don’t work. And someday the patent laws in this country will be updated for the 21st century. Fingers crossed.Image courtesy of Shutterstock. dan lyons Tags:#Apple#FaceTime#iPad#iPhone#legal#Mac#mobile#patent#patent troll#VirnetX A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic…center_img Related Posts Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Marketlast_img read more

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first_imgThe Prevention of Money Laundering Act Adjudicating Authority has confirmed the attachment of a Panchkula property worth more than ₹64 crore by the Enforcement Directorate in a case against the Associated Journals Limited (AJL) and others. The land was “illegally” reallotted to the company, which runs The National Herald, when Bhupinder Singh Hooda was the Haryana Chief Minister. According to the Enforcement Directorate, the plot was originally allotted to the AJL in 1982. However, as construction work was not undertaken in compliance with the conditions of the allotment, the land was taken back by the State government in October 1992. The cancellation became irreversible after a revision petition was dismissed in 1996. After Mr. Hooda became the Chief Minister, he allegedly misused his office and got the land reallotted in August 2005.last_img read more