7 10 19

Halton police are looking for a man in his mid to late twenties after several financial cards were stolen and then used in Brampton. Police say in the early morning hours of Oct. 2, someone took several items including the financial cards from a vehicle parked in a driveway near 3 Side Rd. in Campbellville.The cards were used a short time later in Brampton by a man who was captured on a surveillance camera. Investigators are looking for a man with a heavy build, a full light-coloured beard and was wearing black and red high top shoes, long black shorts, a plain red hooded sweater and a black New York Yankees cap. Police say a red, four-door sedan with a sunroof and one working fog light was also captured in the video. Anyone with information that may help police with this investigation is asked to contact Detective Constable Cameron Bokstein at 905-825-4747 ext. 2484. read more

3 10 19

LinkedIn adding new training features, news feeds and ‘bots’ by Brandon Bailey, The Associated Press Posted Sep 22, 2016 1:17 pm MDT Last Updated Sep 22, 2016 at 3:00 pm MDT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email LinkedIn CEO Jeff Weiner speaks during a product announcement at his company’s headquarters, Thursday, Sept. 22, 2016, in San Francisco. LinkedIn wants to become more useful to workers by adding personalized news feeds, helpful messaging “bots” and recommendations for online training courses, as the professional networking service strives to be more than just a tool for job-hunting. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg) SAN FRANCISCO – LinkedIn wants to become more useful to workers by adding personalized news feeds, helpful messaging “bots” and recommendations for online training courses, as the professional networking service strives to be more than just a tool for job-hunting.The new services will arrive just as LinkedIn itself gains a new boss — Microsoft — which is paying $26 billion to acquire the Silicon Valley company later this year.LinkedIn said the new features, which it showed off to reporters Thursday, were in the works before the Microsoft takeover was announced in June. But LinkedIn CEO Jeff Weiner said his company hopes to incorporate some of Microsoft’s technology as it builds more things like conversational “chat bots,” or software that can carry on limited conversations, answer questions and perform tasks like making reservations.Chat bots are a hot new feature in the consumer tech world, where companies like Facebook, Apple and Google are already racing to offer useful services based on artificial intelligence. As a first step, LinkedIn says it will soon introduce a bot that could help someone schedule a meeting with another LinkedIn user, by comparing calendars and suggesting a convenient time and meeting place.The new bot will be part of an online messaging service that LinkedIn is gradually expanding to make it easier for users to communicate without opening a new screen or switching to email.LinkedIn is also adding more personalized features to its news feed, where members can see articles and announcements posted by their professional contacts. A new “Interest Feed” will offer a collection of articles, posts and opinion pieces on major news events or current issues.While many people already turn to Facebook, Twitter or individual news sites for similar updates, LinkedIn managers suggest their feeds will be more tailored to each user’s professional interests, by a combination of human editors and computer algorithms. Similarly, LinkedIn says it’s begun using the online training resources of its Lynda.com educational subsidiary to make personalized recommendations for online courses that augment each user’s current skills or career interests.The new features are the latest additions LinkedIn has made to its core service in recent years — for example, by inviting prominent people and ordinary members to write their own articles or essays for the site.LinkedIn Corp. makes most of its money from fees that job recruiters pay to use its database of more than 450 million members worldwide. But it wants to keep members engaged so they check in regularly and keep their profiles updated. Weiner and other executives say they want to make the site useful for more than just job-hunting.The idea is to “help members be more productive and successful in what they’re trying to do,” said LinkedIn vice-president Ryan Roslansky in an interview.LinkedIn has measured an increase in routine visits to its website and mobile apps over the last year, Roslansky said, even after the company cut back on the volume of email notifications that it sends to members. It did so, he acknowledged, after members complained they were getting too many emails.Microsoft Corp., meanwhile, wants to augment its own workplace software with LinkedIn’s stockpile of information about its members’ job histories and professional contacts. It may combine LinkedIn’s data, for example, with online programs that Microsoft sells to businesses for managing sales, hiring and other back-office functions.Weiner, who is expected to continue running LinkedIn as a semi-independent subsidiary of Microsoft, said the two companies are working on ways to integrate some services. But he said he wasn’t ready to disclose more details. read more

25 09 19

first_imgThe “Cecil Rhodes effect” is creating a chilling atmosphere around the country, experts fear, after it emerged that Queen Mary University of London quietly removed a foundation stone laid by King Leopold II amid student complaints that he was a “genocidal colonialist”.Within weeks of the launch of a petition by the university’s Pan-African Society calling for the foundation stone and commemorative plaque to be taken down, the institution’s authorities yielded to the activists’ demands.King Leopold II, who was a first cousin of Queen Victoria, ruled Belgium from 1865 to 1909. He founded the Congo Free State, now the Democratic of Congo, where he forced natives to work as labourers on rubber plantations. The petition, launched in June, said the plaques should be removed from their “uncritical” place in the Octagon Building and “relocated to a museum…dedicated to the memorialisation of the crimes of genocide, colonialism and imperialism.” King Leopold II of Belgium (1835 – 1909)Credit:Getty Images Dr Joanna Williams, whose book  Academic Freedom in an Age of Conformity was published earlier this year, said: “When universities start removing plaques and statues on the basis of student petitions, without any broader debate or discussion, where and when do they draw the line?“There are very few who have a completely untarnished record when you start looking back through history.“Roads are named after people, streets are named after people – if you start saying you have to have a completely unblemished past to have something named after you, you could argue that every single building and road would be renamed across the country.” Oxford University student campaigned to remove a statue of Cecil RhodesCredit:Eddie Mulholland “The size and prominence of these inscriptions suggested a strength of association that was never the case, and as such the decision was taken to remove both from view.” A plaque removed from Queen Mary's Oxtagonal Building earlier this year following student protests Harvard Law School replaced  its official crest, because of its links to an 18th-century slave owner, following five months of demonstrations and sit-ins by students. The Octagon Building, Queen Mary UniversityCredit:Queen Mary University The “Leopold Must Fall” campaign at Queen Mary is one of a string of student movements calling for universities to sever ties with individuals and objects associated with colonialism. Earlier this year, Oxford University refused to give into calls from the “Rhodes Must Fall” campaign to tear down a statue of Cecil Rhodes from Oriel College over his links with Britain’s colonial past. However, other universities have been quicker to give into student demands. Jesus College at Cambridge University took down a bronze cockerel statue which had been looted during a British colonial expedition to Nigeria in the 19th century, after students asked for it to be repatriated.center_img Dr Williams,  senior lecturer  in higher education at the University of Kent, said that universities were now so quick to respond to student demands that they were losing their ability to “hold the line”. The actions of Queen Mary University of London set a dangerous precedent of universities giving in to students and “whitewashing” history, she said. “It suggests a fear within the university authorities – as if they are scared of the students and pander to their demands to avoid attracting negative attention.” A plaque removed from Queen Mary’s Octagonal Building earlier this year following student protestsCredit:Jacqueline Banerjee Oxford University student campaigned to remove a statue of Cecil Rhodes Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. Just a month later, the university told students that it had removed them “as part of ongoing refurbishment work” to the Octagon Library.Emma Bull, director of student services at the university, told the leaders of the student protest at the time: “Queen Mary University has no historical ties with King Leopold, other than he visited Mile End in April 1887, and then returned to lay the Foundation Stone in June 1887. The Octagon Building, Queen Mary University King Leopold II of Belgiumlast_img read more